Advertisement

 

 

Smoking in the family is most predictive of the development of childhood asthma in preterm babies <30 weeks gestation: Results of the Respiratory Outcomes Study 2 (REPOS2).

Smoking in the family is most predictive of the development of childhood asthma in preterm babies
Author Information (click to view)

Johnston CF, Broom M, Shadbolt B, Todd DA,


Johnston CF, Broom M, Shadbolt B, Todd DA, (click to view)

Johnston CF, Broom M, Shadbolt B, Todd DA,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma 2017 09 13() 0 doi 10.1080/02770903.2017.1366508
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The Respiratory Outcomes Study 2 (RESPOS2) investigated the relationship between neonatal outcomes (specifically, chronic lung disease [CLD]) and environmental factors on the development of asthma and atopic outcomes at primary school age for preterm babies (PBs) <30 weeks gestational age (GA). METHODS
The study included all surviving PBs <30 weeks GA admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Canberra Hospital, Australian Capital Territory between 2007-2009. Parents were sent a questionnaire regarding asthma and atopy symptoms when the PBs were aged 5-7 years old. Data were compared based on CLD status. RESULTS
There were 103 PBs included in the study with a 68.9% response rate to the respiratory questionnaire (71/103). Of these PBs, 15/71 (21.1%) received a diagnosis of CLD. There were no significant differences with regards to asthma, hay fever or eczema in PBs either with or without CLD. The most significant predictor for the development of asthma was smoking in the family (Odds Ratio [OR]: 11.66, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 2.01-67.56) with a trend towards significance for family history of asthma (OR: 3.83, 95% CI: 0.85-17.25).

CONCLUSION
The RESPOS2 has confirmed previous reports that CLD in PBs <30 weeks GA is not associated with the development of childhood asthma, hay fever or eczema. In our group of PBs the strongest predictor of the development of asthma was smoking in the family.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

20 − 18 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]