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Social support, stigma, and HIV disclosure among parents living with HIV in Guangxi, China.

Social support, stigma, and HIV disclosure among parents living with HIV in Guangxi, China.
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Mao Y, Li X, Qiao S, Zhao Q, Zhou Y, Shen Z,


Mao Y, Li X, Qiao S, Zhao Q, Zhou Y, Shen Z, (click to view)

Mao Y, Li X, Qiao S, Zhao Q, Zhou Y, Shen Z,

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AIDS care 2017 10 11() 1-5 doi 10.1080/09540121.2017.1387639

Abstract

Both stigma and social support have been identified to be associated with HIV status disclosure among people living with HIV. This study aimed to examine cross-sectional associations of perceived social support and multiple types of stigma with both disclosure to various target groups and timing of disclosure among parents living with HIV (PLHIV) in Guangxi, China. Cross-sectional data from 1254 PLHIV in Guangxi, China were analyzed. Measures included demographics, disclosure to specific groups (steady partner/spouse, children, family and others) and timing of disclosure, perceived social support, and three types of HIV-related stigma (perceived, internalized, and enacted stigma). Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the associations of interest. The participants who reported higher levels of perceived social support were more likely to have disclosed to steady partner/spouse, family or others. Those who experienced enacted stigma were more likely to have disclosed to children or family. Those who were married/cohabitating were more likely to have disclosed to steady partner/spouse, and less likely to have disclosed to children, family or others. Older PLHIV were less likely to have disclosed to steady partner/spouse, or family. Those who had a job were more likely to have disclosed to steady partner/spouse. Perceived social support appeared not to be associated with timing of disclosure. Those who disclosed within a shorter time after diagnosis were more likely to be women or have disclosed to steady partner/spouse, and less likely to have higher perceived stigma or have disclosed to family. Interventions are needed to help reduce the negative effect of perceived stigma at both family and community levels and to help enhance perceived social support in general and emotional support in particular among PLHIV, especially males and older adults.

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