Advertisement

 

 

Syphilis.

Syphilis.
Author Information (click to view)

Peeling RW, Mabey D, Kamb ML, Chen XS, Radolf JD, Benzaken AS,


Peeling RW, Mabey D, Kamb ML, Chen XS, Radolf JD, Benzaken AS, (click to view)

Peeling RW, Mabey D, Kamb ML, Chen XS, Radolf JD, Benzaken AS,

Advertisement

Nature reviews. Disease primers 2017 10 123() 17073 doi 10.1038/nrdp.2017.73

Abstract

Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (T. pallidum) causes syphilis via sexual exposure or via vertical transmission during pregnancy. T. pallidum is renowned for its invasiveness and immune-evasiveness; its clinical manifestations result from local inflammatory responses to replicating spirochaetes and often imitate those of other diseases. The spirochaete has a long latent period during which individuals have no signs or symptoms but can remain infectious. Despite the availability of simple diagnostic tests and the effectiveness of treatment with a single dose of long-acting penicillin, syphilis is re-emerging as a global public health problem, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM) in high-income and middle-income countries. Syphilis also causes several hundred thousand stillbirths and neonatal deaths every year in developing nations. Although several low-income countries have achieved WHO targets for the elimination of congenital syphilis, an alarming increase in the prevalence of syphilis in HIV-infected MSM serves as a strong reminder of the tenacity of T. pallidum as a pathogen. Strong advocacy and community involvement are needed to ensure that syphilis is given a high priority on the global health agenda. More investment is needed in research on the interaction between HIV and syphilis in MSM as well as into improved diagnostics, a better test of cure, intensified public health measures and, ultimately, a vaccine.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

1 × 1 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]