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Testing our FAITHH: HIV stigma and knowledge after a faith-based HIV stigma reduction intervention in the Rural South.

Testing our FAITHH: HIV stigma and knowledge after a faith-based HIV stigma reduction intervention in the Rural South.
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Payne-Foster P, Bradley ELP, Aduloju-Ajijola N, Yang X, Gaul Z, Parton J, Sutton MY, Gaskins S,


Payne-Foster P, Bradley ELP, Aduloju-Ajijola N, Yang X, Gaul Z, Parton J, Sutton MY, Gaskins S, (click to view)

Payne-Foster P, Bradley ELP, Aduloju-Ajijola N, Yang X, Gaul Z, Parton J, Sutton MY, Gaskins S,

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AIDS care 2017 11 09() 1-8 doi 10.1080/09540121.2017.1371664

Abstract

Eliminating racial/ethnic HIV disparities requires HIV-related stigma reduction. African-American churches have a history of addressing community concerns, including health issues, but may also contribute to stigma. We developed and pilot tested a faith-based, anti-stigma intervention with 12 African-American churches in rural Alabama. We measured HIV-related stigma held by 199 adults who participated in the intervention (individual-level) and their perception of stigma among other congregants (congregational-level). Analyses of pre- and post-assessments using a linear mixed model showed the anti-stigma intervention group reported a significant reduction in individual-level stigma compared with the control group (mean difference: -.70 intervention vs. -.16 control, adjusted p < .05). Findings suggest African-American churches may be poised to aid HIV stigma-reduction efforts.

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