Physical activity (PA) has been evidenced to be associated with self-reported health, but studies providing this evidence have failed to incorporate some relevant covariates, especially those pertinent to an African sample. This study examined the association between PA and self-reported health, with relevant lifestyle factors, comorbidities, and personal characteristics treated as covariates in this assessment. The study population was retired and working older people aged 60 years or more in Accra, Ghana. A total of 686 individuals responded to self-reported questionnaires. Pearson’s chi-square test and binary logistic regression were used to present findings. Our data indicated that older adults who participated in moderate PA for more than 60 minutes were 7 times (OR=7,41; p=0,000) more likely to report good health compared with those who were active for less than 30 minutes. Similarly, those who participated in vigorous PA for 60 or more minutes were 5 times (OR=4,52; p=0,003) more likely to report good health compared with those who were active for less than 30 minutes. It is concluded that PA is likely to better enhance self-reported health when older people avoid sedentary behaviour, reduce their frequency of smoking, and modify their diet, but our covariate adjustment suggests that alcohol intake does not necessarily mar self-reported health.

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