Advertisement

 

 

The Chemical Form of Metal Species Released from Corroded Taper Junctions of Hip Implants: Synchrotron Analysis of Patient Tissue.

The Chemical Form of Metal Species Released from Corroded Taper Junctions of Hip Implants: Synchrotron Analysis of Patient Tissue.
Author Information (click to view)

Di Laura A, Quinn PD, Panagiotopoulou VC, Hothi HS, Henckel J, Powell JJ, Berisha F, Amary F, Mosselmans JFW, Skinner JA, Hart AJ,


Di Laura A, Quinn PD, Panagiotopoulou VC, Hothi HS, Henckel J, Powell JJ, Berisha F, Amary F, Mosselmans JFW, Skinner JA, Hart AJ, (click to view)

Di Laura A, Quinn PD, Panagiotopoulou VC, Hothi HS, Henckel J, Powell JJ, Berisha F, Amary F, Mosselmans JFW, Skinner JA, Hart AJ,

Advertisement

Scientific reports 2017 09 087(1) 10952 doi 10.1038/s41598-017-11225-w
Abstract

The mechanisms of metal release from the articulation at the head cup bearing and the tapered junctions of orthopaedic hip implants are known to differ and the debris generated varies in size, shape and volume. Significantly less metal is lost from the taper junction between Cobalt-Chromium-Molybdenum (CoCrMo) and Titanium (Ti) components (fretting-corrosion dominant mechanism), when compared to the CoCrMo bearing surfaces (wear-corrosion dominant mechanism). Corrosion particles from the taper junction can lead to Adverse Reactions to Metal Debris (ARMD) similar to those seen with CoCrMo bearings. We used synchrotron methods to understand the modes underlying clinically significant tissue reactions to Co, Cr and Ti by analysing viable peri-prosthetic tissue. Cr was present as Cr2O3 in the corroded group in addition to CrPO4 found in the metal-on-metal (MoM) group. Interestingly, Ti was present as TiO2 in an amorphous rather than rutile or anatase physical form. The metal species were co-localized in the same micron-scale particles as result of corrosion processes and in one cell type, the phagocytes. This work gives new insights into the degradation products from metal devices as well as guidance for toxicological studies in humans.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

14 + twelve =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]