corticosteroid injection (CSI) has been used to treat greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS) for many years. However, so far, the efficacy of CSI in the treatment of GTPS is still controversial. Therefore, the aim of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of CSI in comparison with sham intervention, nature history, usual care, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), physiotherapy/exercise therapy, dry needling, or other nonsurgical treatment for improvements in pain and function in GTPS.
PubMed (Medline), Embase, Cochrane Library were searched from their inception until April 2021. Randomized controlled trails (RCTs) comparing CSI to nonsurgical treatment were included. Data on the effect of CSI on pain and function were extracted and checked by two review authors independently. The treatment effect was analyzed in the short term, medium term, and long term.
Eight RCTs (764 patients) were included. This review suggests CSI may be superior to usual care and ‘wait and see,’ ESWT, but may not be superior to exercise, PRP, dry needling, and sham intervention in short-term pain or function improvement. In terms of medium-term pain or function improvement, CSI may be superior to usual care and ‘wait and see,’ but may not be superior to PRP. In terms of long-term pain or function improvement, CSI may be inferior to PRP and ESWT, but it may be superior to usual care and ‘wait and see’ at 12 months.
Due to the small sample size and lack of sufficient clinical studies, current evidence is equivocal regarding the efficacy of CSI in the treatment of GTPS. Considering the limitations, more large-sample and high-quality RCTs are needed to prove the therapeutic effect of CSI on GTPS.
PROSPERO registration number: CRD42021247991. Registered 09 May 2021.

© 2022. The Author(s).