Advertisement

 

 

The Impact of Preoperative Depression on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Survey Results in a Lumbar Fusion Population.

The Impact of Preoperative Depression on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Survey Results in a Lumbar Fusion Population.
Author Information (click to view)

Levin JM, Winkelman RD, Smith GA, Tanenbaum J, Benzel EC, Mroz TE, Steinmetz MP,


Levin JM, Winkelman RD, Smith GA, Tanenbaum J, Benzel EC, Mroz TE, Steinmetz MP, (click to view)

Levin JM, Winkelman RD, Smith GA, Tanenbaum J, Benzel EC, Mroz TE, Steinmetz MP,

Advertisement

Spine 2017 02 06() doi 10.1097/BRS.0000000000002101
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN
A retrospective cohort study at a single institution.

OBJECTIVE
To determine the effect of preoperative depression on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey scores in a lumbar fusion population.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA
HCAHPS surveys are used to assess the quality of the patient experience, and directly influences reimbursement for hospital systems and spine surgeons nationwide. Untreated depression has been linked to worse functional outcomes in spine surgery. However, we aimed to elucidate if HCAHPS survey responses were different in depressed patients.

METHODS
Prospectively collected functional outcome data including Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ) were analyzed preoperatively. Preoperative PHQ-9 scores of greater than or equal to 10 (moderate to severe depression) defined our depressed cohort of patients. HCAHPS responses were obtained for each individual, allowing for real-world analysis of outcomes in this population.

RESULTS
In our 237 patient cohort, depressed patients were younger, female, were on full disability, and had lower scores on EQ-5D and PDQ preoperatively. 73.2% of depressed patients felt doctors treated them with respect, compared to 88.8% of patients without depression (p = 0.005). Also, depressed patients felt nurses treated them with less respect (p = 0.014) and that physicians did not listen to them as carefully (p = 0.029). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that patients with preoperative depression had higher odds of patients feeling less respected by both physicians and nurses. Multivariate analysis also revealed that depression was an independent predictor of lower patient satisfaction with nursing response to their needs.

CONCLUSIONS
In patients undergoing lumbar fusion, preoperative depression was shown to have negative impact on patient experience measured by the HCAHPS survey. These results suggest that depression may be a modifiable risk factor for poor hospital experience.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE
3.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

9 − one =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]