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The Impact of Self-Reported Sleep on Caesarean Delivery in Women Undergoing Induction of Labour: A Prospective Study.

The Impact of Self-Reported Sleep on Caesarean Delivery in Women Undergoing Induction of Labour: A Prospective Study.
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Teong ACA, Diong AX, Omar SZ, Tan PC,


Teong ACA, Diong AX, Omar SZ, Tan PC, (click to view)

Teong ACA, Diong AX, Omar SZ, Tan PC,

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Scientific reports 2017 09 267(1) 12339 doi 10.1038/s41598-017-12410-7
Abstract

216 women admitted for labour induction were recruited to evaluate sleep duration and other sleep measures on Caesarean delivery risk. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Berlin (Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA), Epworth Sleepiness Scale, International Restless Leg Syndrome, Insomnia Symptom Questionnaires were applied. Short sleep duration was defined as reported night sleep length in the previous month below the study population median of 6 hours. After binomial analysis, Caesarean delivery after labour induction is associated with short sleep duration (RR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-2.9, P = 0.018), nulliparity, Bishop Score, prepregnant BMI and birth weight at P < 0.05. After adjustment for nulliparity, Bishop Score, prepregnant BMI and birth weight, short sleep duration remains independently predictive of Caesarean delivery AOR 2.4, 95% CI 1.1-5.0, P = 0.026. Women at high risk for OSA has a non-significant result on binomial analysis, RR 1.6, 95% CI 1.0-2.7, P = 0.073. In a sensitivity analysis which includes OSA in the multivariable logistic regression model, OSA's predictive effect is attenuated AOR 1.2, 95% CI 0.4-3.2, P = 0.782 whilst short sleep duration remains significant AOR 2.3 95% CI 1.0-5.1, P = 0.039. Other evaluated sleep measures are not predictive of Caesarean delivery.

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