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The influence of gender on early adverse events, hospital charges and length of stay after shoulder arthroplasty.

The influence of gender on early adverse events, hospital charges and length of stay after shoulder arthroplasty.
Author Information (click to view)

Saltzman BM, Basques B, Leroux T, Frank RM, Nicholson GP, Verma NN, Romeo AA,


Saltzman BM, Basques B, Leroux T, Frank RM, Nicholson GP, Verma NN, Romeo AA, (click to view)

Saltzman BM, Basques B, Leroux T, Frank RM, Nicholson GP, Verma NN, Romeo AA,

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International orthopaedics 2017 07 09() doi 10.1007/s00264-017-3547-6
Abstract
PURPOSE
To identify differences in demographics, diagnosis, arthroplasty type, early adverse events, length of stay, and hospital costs between men and women undergoing shoulder arthroplasty.

METHODS
We used a nationally representative U.S. population database to determine annual rates of shoulder arthroplasty (SA) in patients (2002-2011). Early adverse events, length-of-stay and hospitalization costs were determined, and compared between patient genders.

RESULTS
A cohort of 372,753 patients underwent total-SA (TSA) (59.7% females). Females were significantly older, more often had Medicare insurance, had a higher proportion of fracture diagnosis, more often underwent hemiarthroplasty (HA), and had significantly lower odds of any adverse event, MI, and sepsis, but higher odds of peripheral nerve injury. Females had significantly greater hospital lengths of stay for all combined procedures, and isolated TSA, reverse-TSA, and HA. Hospital costs were significantly lower in females for all combined procedures and HA.

CONCLUSIONS
Male patients had significantly higher odds of adverse events, death, MI, and sepsis following SA. Female patients had significantly longer lengths of stay but lower hospital charges following SA.

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