Advertisement

 

 

The interdependencies of viral load, the innate immune response, and clinical outcome in children presenting to the emergency department with respiratory syncytial virus-associated bronchiolitis.

The interdependencies of viral load, the innate immune response, and clinical outcome in children presenting to the emergency department with respiratory syncytial virus-associated bronchiolitis.
Author Information (click to view)

Piedra FA, Mei M, Avadhanula V, Mehta R, Aideyan L, Garofalo RP, Piedra PA,


Piedra FA, Mei M, Avadhanula V, Mehta R, Aideyan L, Garofalo RP, Piedra PA, (click to view)

Piedra FA, Mei M, Avadhanula V, Mehta R, Aideyan L, Garofalo RP, Piedra PA,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

PloS one 2017 03 0712(3) e0172953 doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0172953

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes significant infant morbidity and mortality. For decades severe RSV-induced disease was thought to result from an uncontrolled host response to viral replication, but recent work suggests that a strong innate immune response early in infection is protective. To shed light on host-virus interactions and the viral determinants of disease, copy numbers of five RSV genes (NS1, NS2, N, G, F) were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in nasal wash samples from children with RSV-associated bronchiolitis. Correlations were sought with host cytokines/chemokines and biomarkers. Associations with disposition from the emergency department (hospitalized or sent home) and pulse oximetry O2 saturation levels were also sought. Additionally, RNase P copy number was measured and used to normalize nasal wash data. RSV gene copy numbers were found to significantly correlate with both cytokine/chemokine and biomarker levels; and RNase P-normalized viral gene copy numbers (NS1, NS2, N and G) were significantly higher in infants with less severe disease. Moreover, three of the normalized viral gene copy numbers (NS1, NS2, and N) correlated significantly with arterial O2 saturation levels. The data support a model where a higher viral load early in infection can promote a robust innate immune response that protects against progression into hypoxic RSV-induced lower respiratory tract illness.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

6 − 3 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]