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The salivary microbiome is consistent between subjects and resistant to impacts of short-term hospitalization.

The salivary microbiome is consistent between subjects and resistant to impacts of short-term hospitalization.
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Cabral DJ, Wurster JI, Flokas ME, Alevizakos M, Zabat M, Korry BJ, Rowan AD, Sano WH, Andreatos N, Ducharme RB, Chan PA, Mylonakis E, Fuchs BB, Belenky P,


Cabral DJ, Wurster JI, Flokas ME, Alevizakos M, Zabat M, Korry BJ, Rowan AD, Sano WH, Andreatos N, Ducharme RB, Chan PA, Mylonakis E, Fuchs BB, Belenky P, (click to view)

Cabral DJ, Wurster JI, Flokas ME, Alevizakos M, Zabat M, Korry BJ, Rowan AD, Sano WH, Andreatos N, Ducharme RB, Chan PA, Mylonakis E, Fuchs BB, Belenky P,

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Scientific reports 2017 09 087(1) 11040 doi 10.1038/s41598-017-11427-2
Abstract

In recent years, a growing amount of research has begun to focus on the oral microbiome due to its links with health and systemic disease. The oral microbiome has numerous advantages that make it particularly useful for clinical studies, including non-invasive collection, temporal stability, and lower complexity relative to other niches, such as the gut. Despite recent discoveries made in this area, it is unknown how the oral microbiome responds to short-term hospitalization. Previous studies have demonstrated that the gut microbiome is extremely sensitive to short-term hospitalization and that these changes are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Here, we present a comprehensive pipeline for reliable bedside collection, sequencing, and analysis of the human salivary microbiome. We also develop a novel oral-specific mock community for pipeline validation. Using our methodology, we analyzed the salivary microbiomes of patients before and during hospitalization or azithromycin treatment to profile impacts on this community. Our findings indicate that azithromycin alters the diversity and taxonomic composition of the salivary microbiome; however, we also found that short-term hospitalization does not impact the richness or structure of this community, suggesting that the oral cavity may be less susceptible to dysbiosis during short-term hospitalization.

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