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The Use of Mobile Applications Among Adults with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Results from the Second MILES-Australia (MILES-2) Study.

The Use of Mobile Applications Among Adults with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Results from the Second MILES-Australia (MILES-2) Study.
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Trawley S, Baptista S, Browne JL, Pouwer F, Speight J,


Trawley S, Baptista S, Browne JL, Pouwer F, Speight J, (click to view)

Trawley S, Baptista S, Browne JL, Pouwer F, Speight J,

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Diabetes technology & therapeutics 2017 10 13() doi 10.1089/dia.2017.0235
Abstract
BACKGROUND
While the number of diabetes-specific mobile applications (apps) continues to grow, there is a lack of knowledge about their actual use.

METHODS
The second MILES (Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success)-Australia study was a national cross-sectional survey of the psychological, behavioral, and social aspects of diabetes for adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Associations between diabetes-specific app usage and demographic, clinical, and psychosocial variables were examined.

RESULTS
Of the 1589 respondents responding to the diabetes-specific app questions, 795 had T1D (mean ± standard deviation age 43 ± 14 years; 61% women; diabetes duration 19 ± 14 years) and 794 had T2D (age 60 ± 9 years; 40% women; diabetes duration 11 ± 7 years). Among adults with T1D, 24% (n = 188) reported using apps, with carbohydrate counting (74%; n = 139) as the most common cited purpose. App usage was significantly associated with shorter diabetes duration, more frequent glucose monitoring, and lower self-reported HbA1c. Among adults with T2D, 8% (n = 64) reported using apps, with glucose monitoring (62%; n = 39) as the most common purpose. For all respondents, the most commonly reported reason for not using apps was a belief that they could not help with diabetes self-management.

CONCLUSIONS
A minority of adults with T1D and T2D use apps to support their self-management. App use among adults with T1D is associated with a more recent T1D diagnosis, more frequent glucose monitoring, and lower self-reported HbA1c. Future efforts should focus on this association and determine the mechanisms by which app use is related to better clinical outcomes.

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