Advertisement

 

 

Time spent with cats is never wasted: Lessons learned from feline acromegalic cardiomyopathy, a naturally occurring animal model of the human disease.

Time spent with cats is never wasted: Lessons learned from feline acromegalic cardiomyopathy, a naturally occurring animal model of the human disease.
Author Information (click to view)

Borgeat K, Niessen SJM, Wilkie L, Harrington N, Church DB, Luis Fuentes V, Connolly DJ,


Borgeat K, Niessen SJM, Wilkie L, Harrington N, Church DB, Luis Fuentes V, Connolly DJ, (click to view)

Borgeat K, Niessen SJM, Wilkie L, Harrington N, Church DB, Luis Fuentes V, Connolly DJ,

Advertisement

PloS one 2018 03 2913(3) e0194342 doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0194342

Abstract
BACKGROUND
In humans, acromegaly due to a pituitary somatotrophic adenoma is a recognized cause of increased left ventricular (LV) mass. Acromegalic cardiomyopathy is incompletely understood, and represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality. We describe the clinical, echocardiographic and histopathologic features of naturally occurring feline acromegalic cardiomyopathy, an emerging disease among domestic cats.

METHODS
Cats with confirmed hypersomatotropism (IGF-1>1000ng/ml and pituitary mass; n = 67) were prospectively recruited, as were two control groups: diabetics (IGF-1<800ng/ml; n = 24) and healthy cats without known endocrinopathy or cardiovascular disease (n = 16). Echocardiography was performed in all cases, including after hypersomatotropism treatment where applicable. Additionally, tissue samples from deceased cats with hypersomatotropism, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and age-matched controls (n = 21 each) were collected and systematically histopathologically reviewed and compared. RESULTS
By echocardiography, cats with hypersomatotropism had a greater maximum LV wall thickness (6.5mm, 4.1-10.1mm) than diabetic (5.9mm, 4.2-9.1mm; Mann Whitney, p<0.001) or control cats (5.2mm, 4.1-6.5mm; Mann Whitney, p<0.001). Left atrial diameter was also greater in cats with hypersomatotropism (16.6mm, 13.0-29.5mm) than in diabetic (15.4mm, 11.2-20.3mm; Mann Whitney, p<0.001) and control cats (14.0mm, 12.6-17.4mm; Mann Whitney, p<0.001). After hypophysectomy and normalization of IGF-1 concentration (n = 20), echocardiographic changes proved mostly reversible. As in humans, histopathology of the feline acromegalic heart was dominated by myocyte hypertrophy with interstitial fibrosis and minimal myofiber disarray. CONCLUSIONS
These results demonstrate cats could be considered a naturally occurring model of acromegalic cardiomyopathy, and as such help elucidate mechanisms driving cardiovascular remodeling in this disease.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

twelve − 4 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]