WEDNESDAY, Dec. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — From 2008 to 2017, there was an increase in the incidence of trampoline-related pediatric fractures, with a significant increase in the odds of a fracture occurring at a place of recreation or sport, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in Pediatrics.

Nancy Hadley-Miller, M.D., from the Children’s Hospital Colorado in Aurora, and colleagues queried the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System for fractures in children aged 0 to 17 years occurring between 2008 and 2017.

The researchers found a 3.85 percent increase in the incidence of trampoline-related pediatric fractures per person-year during the study period. The incidence of pediatric trampoline-related fractures increased from 35.3 per 100,000 person-years in 2008 to 53 per 100,000 person-years in 2017. The odds of a trampoline fracture requiring hospitalization did not change (odds ratio per one year, 1.02; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.96 to 1.07; P = 0.5431). The odds of a fracture occurring at a place of recreation or sport increased significantly (odds ratio per year, 1.32; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.21 to 1.43; P < 0.0001).

“The recent increase in fracture incidence coincides with an increase in the popularity of recreational and sporting trampoline parks,” the authors write. “As these new avenues of participation become increasingly popular, future advocacy and injury prevention campaigns should potentially broaden their focus to address the changing locale of pediatric trampoline fractures.”

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