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Trends in Diagnosis-Specific Work Disability Before and After Stroke: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study in Sweden.

Trends in Diagnosis-Specific Work Disability Before and After Stroke: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study in Sweden.
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Lallukka T, Ervasti J, Lundström E, Mittendorfer-Rutz E, Friberg E, Virtanen M, Alexanderson K,


Lallukka T, Ervasti J, Lundström E, Mittendorfer-Rutz E, Friberg E, Virtanen M, Alexanderson K, (click to view)

Lallukka T, Ervasti J, Lundström E, Mittendorfer-Rutz E, Friberg E, Virtanen M, Alexanderson K,

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Journal of the American Heart Association 2018 01 047(1) pii e006991
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Although a stroke event often leads to work disability, diagnoses behind work disability before and after stroke are largely unknown. We examined the pre-event and postevent trends in diagnosis-specific work disability among patients of working age.

METHODS AND RESULTS
We included all new nonfatal stroke events in 2006-2008 from population-based hospital registers in Sweden among women and men aged 25 to 60 years (n=12 972). Annual days of diagnosis-specific work disability were followed for 4 years before and after stroke. Repeated measures negative binomial regression models using the generalized estimating equations method were fitted to examine trends in diagnosis-specific work disability before and after the event. Already during the 4 pre-event years, work disability attributed to circulatory diseases increased among women (rate ratio, 1.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.68-2.36) and men (rate ratio, 2.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-2.57). Increasing trends before stroke were also found for work disability attributed to mental disorders, musculoskeletal diseases, neoplasms, diseases of the nervous, respiratory, and digestive systems, injuries, and diabetes mellitus. As expected, a sharp increase in work disability days attributed to circulatory diseases was found during the first year after the event among both sexes. Overall, during 4 years after the stroke, there was a decreasing trend for circulatory diseases and injuries, whereas the trend was increasing for nervous diseases and diabetes mellitus.

CONCLUSIONS
Work disability attributed to several mental and somatic diagnoses is higher already before a stroke event.

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