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Tuberculosis – United States, 2017.

Tuberculosis – United States, 2017.
Author Information (click to view)

Stewart RJ, Tsang CA, Pratt RH, Price SF, Langer AJ,


Stewart RJ, Tsang CA, Pratt RH, Price SF, Langer AJ, (click to view)

Stewart RJ, Tsang CA, Pratt RH, Price SF, Langer AJ,

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MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report 2018 03 2367(11) 317-323 doi 10.15585/mmwr.mm6711a2

Abstract

In 2017, a total of 9,093 new cases of tuberculosis (TB) were provisionally* reported in the United States, representing an incidence rate of 2.8 cases per 100,000 population. The case count decreased by 1.8% from 2016 to 2017, and the rate declined by 2.5% over the same period. These decreases are consistent with the slight decline in TB seen over the past several years (1). This report summarizes provisional TB surveillance data reported to CDC’s National Tuberculosis Surveillance System for 2017 and in the last decade. The rate of TB among non-U.S.-born persons in 2017 was 15 times the rate among U.S.-born persons. Among non-U.S.-born persons, the highest TB rate among all racial/ethnic groups was among Asians (27.0 per 100,000 persons), followed by non-Hispanic blacks (blacks; 22.0). Among U.S.-born persons, most TB cases were reported among blacks (37.1%), followed by non-Hispanic whites (whites; 29.5%). Previous studies have shown that the majority of TB cases in the United States are attributed to reactivation of latent TB infection (LTBI) (2). Ongoing efforts to prevent TB transmission and disease in the United States remain important to continued progress toward TB elimination. Testing and treatment of populations most at risk for TB disease and LTBI, including persons born in countries with high TB prevalence and persons in high-risk congregate settings (3), are major components of this effort.

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