Advertisement

 

 

Tuberculosis/cryptococcosis co-infection in China between 1965 and 2016.

Tuberculosis/cryptococcosis co-infection in China between 1965 and 2016.
Author Information (click to view)

Fang W, Zhang L, Liu J, Denning DW, Hagen F, Jiang W, Hong N, Deng S, Lei X, Deng D, Liao W, Xu J, Boekhout T, Chen M, Pan W,


Fang W, Zhang L, Liu J, Denning DW, Hagen F, Jiang W, Hong N, Deng S, Lei X, Deng D, Liao W, Xu J, Boekhout T, Chen M, Pan W, (click to view)

Fang W, Zhang L, Liu J, Denning DW, Hagen F, Jiang W, Hong N, Deng S, Lei X, Deng D, Liao W, Xu J, Boekhout T, Chen M, Pan W,

Advertisement

Emerging microbes & infections 2017 08 236(8) e73 doi 10.1038/emi.2017.61

Abstract

Cases of tuberculosis/cryptococcosis co-infection are rapidly increasing in China. However, most studies addressing this co-infection have been published in Chinese journals, and this publication strategy has obscured this disease trend for scientists in other parts of the world. Our investigation found that 62.9% of all co-infection cases worldwide were reported in the Chinese population (n=197) between 1965 and 2016, and 56.3% of these Chinese cases were reported after 2010. Nearly all cases originated from the warm and wet monsoon regions of China. HIV-positive subjects tended to correlate with more severe manifestations of a tuberculosis/cryptococcosis co-infection than those without HIV. Notablely, dual tubercular/cryptococcal meningitis was the most frequent (54.0%) and most easily misdiagnosed (95.2%, n=40/42) co-infection. We also found that the combined use of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and concentrations of glucose, protein and chlorine might be an inexpensive and effective indicator to differentiate tubercular/cryptococcal co-infection meningitis from tubercular meningitis and cryptococcal meningitis.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

16 + sixteen =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]