The aim of the present study was to investigate various aspects of tiagabine (TGB) effectiveness in Bulgarian patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. This open, prospective study recruited the patients with epilepsy attending the Clinic of Neurology at the University Hospital of Plovdiv, Bulgaria. The patients completed diaries about the seizure frequency, severity, and adverse events. There were regular documented visits at 3 or 6 months during the first year of treatment with TGB and at 6 months or 1 year afterwards, with dynamic assessment of seizure frequency, severity, adverse events, and EEG recordings. TGB was applied as an add-on treatment in 43 patients (24 males, mean age 39 years). There was relatively mild and transient dynamic improvement of seizure severity, satisfactory seizure frequency reduction in 32.6% of participants, stable mean seizure frequency reduction (40-50%) from month 6 to month 24 and a stable response rate (52.3-50%) during the same period. New seizure types (myoclonic, myoclonic-atonic) occurred in 2 patients. The final clinical efficacy was higher in patients with initial monotherapy. There were adverse events (dizziness/vertigo, sedation, memory impairment, loss of appetite and weight, confusion, psychosis, insomnia, transient diplopia, lymphadenomegaly, rash, nausea, depression, anxiety, tremor of hands, unstable gait, legs edema, thrombocytopenia, cervical muscles tightening) in 26.19% of patients. In conclusion, TGB treatment is associated with low and transient improvement of seizure severity, good and stable improvement of seizure frequency, possible worsening of seizure control, possible appearance of new seizure types, and acceptable safety and tolerability.
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