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Vasopressin and metabolic disorders: translation from experimental models to clinical use.

Vasopressin and metabolic disorders: translation from experimental models to clinical use.
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Nakamura K, Velho G, Bouby N,


Nakamura K, Velho G, Bouby N, (click to view)

Nakamura K, Velho G, Bouby N,

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Journal of internal medicine 2017 07 08() doi 10.1111/joim.12649
Abstract

Vasopressin has many physiological actions in addition to its well-defined role in the control of fluid homeostasis and urine concentration. An increasing body of evidence suggests that the vasopressin-hydration axis plays a role in glucose homeostasis. This review summarizes the knowledge accumulated over the last decades about the influence of vasopressin in the short-term regulation of glycemia. It describes the possible role of this hormone through activation of V1a and V1b receptors on liver and pancreas functions and on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Moreover, we report recent in vivo studies demonstrating the role of vasopressin in the long-term regulation of glycemia. Indeed, V1a- or double V1aV1b-receptor knock-out mice display significant changes in the glucose and lipid metabolism. In rats, sustained high V1aR activation increases basal glycemia and aggravates glucose intolerance in obese rats. Finally, the translation from animal findings to human was evidenced by epidemiological and genetic studies that showed that high vasopressin level is a risk factor for hyperglycemia, metabolic disorders and diabetes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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