Advertisement

 

 

Vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance as risk factors for dyslipidemia in obese children.

Vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance as risk factors for dyslipidemia in obese children.
Author Information (click to view)

Erol M, Bostan Gayret Ö, Hamilçıkan Ş, Can E, Yiğit ÖL,


Erol M, Bostan Gayret Ö, Hamilçıkan Ş, Can E, Yiğit ÖL, (click to view)

Erol M, Bostan Gayret Ö, Hamilçıkan Ş, Can E, Yiğit ÖL,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Archivos argentinos de pediatria 115(2) 133-139 doi http://dx.doi.org/10.5546/aap.2017.eng.133
Abstract
INTRODUCTION
Dyslipidemia is one of the major complications of obesity; vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance are attending metabolic complications in dyslipidemic obese children. Objective. To determine if vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance are risk factors for dyslipidemia in obese children.

MATERIALS AND METHODS
This study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics at Bagcilar Training and Research Hospital in Istanbul, Turkey between 2014 and 2015. Obese patients whose age range was 8-14 were included in the study. The serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, highdensity lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting glucose, insulin, alanine aminotransferase, vitamin D levels were measured; a liver ultrasonography was performed. Homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR), was used to calculate insulin resistance.

RESULTS
108 obese children were included; 39 (36.11%) had dyslipidemia. The average fasting blood glucose (88.74 ± 7.58 vs. 95.31 ± 6.82; p= 0.0001), insulin level (14.71 ± 12.44 vs. 24.39 ± 15.02; p= 0.0001) and alanine aminotransferase level (23.45 ± 11.18 vs. 30.4 ± 18.95; p= 0.018) were significantly higher in the children with dyslipidemia. In the dyslipidemic obese children, the average hepatosteatosis rate and HOMA-IR level were higher; 28 (71.9%) had hepatosteatosis, 37 (94.87%) had insulin resistance; the vitamin D levels were <20 ng/ml in 69.3%. Vitamin D deficiency was significantly more common (p= 0.033). The multivariate regression analysis confirmed that the increase in the HOMA-IR level (p= 0.015) and the low vitamin D level (p= 0.04) were important risk factors for dyslipidemia. CONCLUSION
Obese children in our region exhibit low vitamin D and increased HOMA-IR levels, which are efficient risk factors of dyslipidemia.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 + 19 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]