WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Children with lower birth size and slower body mass index (BMI) gain in early childhood have lower lung function at 7 years, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the European Respiratory Journal.

Gabriela P. Peralta, from ISGlobal in Barcelona, Spain, and colleagues evaluated the association of early childhood growth (measured by BMI trajectories up to 4 years) with lung function at 7 years among 1,257 children participating in a population-based birth cohort.

The researchers found that compared with children with average birth size and slower BMI gain (reference), children with higher birth size and accelerated BMI gain had higher percent predicted forced vital capacity (FVC) and lower percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second/FVC at 7 years. Findings were similar for children with lower birth size and accelerated BMI gain. Children with lower birth size and slower BMI gain had lower percent predicted FVC at 7 years. There were no associations for forced expiratory flow at 25 to 75 percent.

“Independently of birth size, children with accelerated BMI gain in early childhood had higher lung function at 7 years but showed airflow limitation,” the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

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