Advertisement

 

 

‘Well, it literally stops me from having a life when it’s really bad’: a nested qualitative interview study of patient views on the use of self-management treatments for the management of recurrent sinusitis (SNIFS trial).

‘Well, it literally stops me from having a life when it’s really bad’: a nested qualitative interview study of patient views on the use of self-management treatments for the management of recurrent sinusitis (SNIFS trial).
Author Information (click to view)

Leydon GM, McDermott L, Thomas T, Halls A, Holdstock-Brown B, Petley S, Wiseman C, Little P, ,


Leydon GM, McDermott L, Thomas T, Halls A, Holdstock-Brown B, Petley S, Wiseman C, Little P, , (click to view)

Leydon GM, McDermott L, Thomas T, Halls A, Holdstock-Brown B, Petley S, Wiseman C, Little P, ,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

BMJ open 2017 11 037(11) e017130 doi 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017130
Abstract
OBJECTIVE
To explore the experience and perceptions of illness, the decision to consult a general practitioner and the use of self-management approaches for chronic or recurrent sinusitis.

DESIGN
Qualitative semistructured interview study.

SETTING
UK primary care.

PARTICIPANTS
32 participants who had been participating in the ‘SNIFS’ (Steam inhalation and Nasal Irrigation For recurrent Sinusitis) trial in the South of England.

METHOD
Thematic analysis of semistructured telephone interviews.

RESULTS
Participants often reported dramatic impact on both activities and their quality of life. Participants were aware of both antibiotic side effects and resistance, but if they had previously been prescribed antibiotics, many patients believed that they would be necessary for the future treatment of sinusitis. Participants used self-help treatments for short and limited periods of time only. In the context of the trial, steam inhalation used for recurrent sinusitis was described as acceptable but is seen as having limited effectiveness. Nasal irrigation was viewed as acceptable and beneficial by more patients. However, some participants reported that they would not use the treatment again due to the uncomfortable side effects they experienced, which outweighed any symptom relief, which may have resulted had they continued.

CONCLUSIONS
Steam inhalation is acceptable but seen as having limited effectiveness. Nasal irrigation is generally acceptable and beneficial for symptoms, but detailed information on the correct procedure and potential benefits of persisting may increase acceptability and adherence in those patients who find it uncomfortable.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER
ISRCTN 88204146.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

twenty − 19 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]