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Diabetes Side Effects: Breaking the Silence

Diabetes Side Effects: Breaking the Silence

Sexual and urologic complications among men and women with diabetes have historically received relatively little attention from clinicians. Diabetes impacts the function and structure of the lower urinary tract, including the bladder and prostate. Studies suggest that urologic complications resulting from diabetes may be even more common than that of widely recognized microvascular complications, such as retinopathy, neuropathy, or nephropathy. “Diabetes can lead to different types of sexual and urologic complications in both men and women,” says Jeanette S. Brown, MD (Table 1). “These include urinary incontinence (UI), poor bladder emptying, sexual dysfunction, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), and urinary tract infections (UTIs). Treatment options are available for many of these sexual and urologic complications. Unfortunately, these problems often go unaddressed because patients oftentimes will not discuss these issues with their clinicians.” Caring for Women: Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Urinary incontinence has been estimated to be more common in women with type 2 diabetes than in women with normal glucose levels (Table 2). There is also evidence that women with pre-diabetes are at higher risk for incontinence. The clinical diagnosis of UI—and more broadly, LUTS—is typically based on a variety of factors, and Dr. Brown says that clinicians can be proactive by paying attention to patient complaints when they arise. “It can often be difficult for women to speak up when they develop issues like UI, LUTS, or UTIs, but we should be asking them about these symptoms regularly during office visits,” Dr. Brown says. “When symptoms are identified, we can then take that opportunity to educate patients about the possible treatment options that are available to manage these...
Group Education & Older Diabetics

Group Education & Older Diabetics

Studies suggest that group-based diabetes education efforts can improve short- and long-term disease control among younger patients, but few analyses have explored the effect of these programs on older adults. Unfortunately, older adults are often underrepresented in diabetes edu­cation interventions because subtle changes in functional, cognitive, and psychosocial status can affect diabetes self-care. Many clinicians are reluctant to refer older patients to group education because they believe they may require more individual attention. In a secondary analysis study published in Diabetes Care, we examined whether community-dwelling older adults aged 60 to 75 with type 1 or type 2 diabetes would benefit from self-management interventions similarly to younger and middle-aged adults. We also tested if older adults benefited from group versus individual self-management interventions. Comparing Benefits of Diabetes Intervention In our analysis, patients were randomly assigned to one of three self-management interventions from diabetes educators that were delivered separately to those with type 1 or type 2 disease: 1. Highly structured group: Five group sessions were conducted over 6 weeks. Patients were taught how food, medication, and exercise affected A1C and actions they could take when levels were out of range. Between classes, patients set daily goals and practiced problem solving 2. Attention control group: Five group sessions were conducted over 6 weeks, but the sessions followed a manual-based standard diabetes education program. 3. Control group: One-on-one sessions were delivered for 6 months. During sessions, patients could receive any type of information they requested. According to our results, A1C levels improved equally in the older and younger groups at 3, 6, and 12 months with all interventions and for those...

Discussing New Cancer Prevention Guidelines

[xyz_lbx_custom_shortcode id=5] According to recent reports from national and international research teams, approximately one-third of all cancers can be prevented by maintaining a healthy weight, eating a healthy diet, and exercising regularly. Published studies have indicated that obesity plays a major role in cancer development through a number of biological mechanisms. Since the American Cancer Society (ACS) last published guidelines on nutrition and physical activity for cancer prevention in 2006, there has been mounting evidence addressing the role of obesity in the development of cancer. While it is not a new concept that daily exercise is important to helping prevent cancer, what has emerged in the literature is that prolonged sitting time (eg, watching television or sitting at the computer) also appears to significantly increase risks. Educate Patients on Cancer Prevention In the CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, the ACS published an update to the 2006 guidelines that focused on reducing cancer risk with healthy food choices and physical activity. “The new recommendations emphasize that any level of positive change in diet or exercise is a step in the right direction to encourage patients to achieve optimum weight and exercise levels,” says Elisa V. Bandera, MD, PhD, who was a coauthor of the guidelines. “The loss of only a few pounds for obese and overweight people is beneficial. Small changes may lead to bigger ones and further encourage people to start changing their lifestyle for the better.” Dr. Bandera says that clinicians should educate patients about the health risks associated with being overweight and obese and provide them with the recommendations outlined in the guidelines (Table 1). She...

Reducing Triglyceride Levels in Patients at Risk for CVD

Almost one-third of adults in the United States have elevated triglyceride levels (>150 mg/dL), and these levels are continuing to rise in adults aged 20 to 49 at rates that mirror those of obesity and diabetes diagnoses among the young. Observational and epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that high triglycerides (200-500 mg/dL) are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), with the highest levels (≥1,000 mg/dL) associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis. “High triglyceride levels indicate that patients have high levels of circulating cholesterol-rich remnants,” explains Michael Miller, MD. “Cholesterol-rich remnants are highly atherogenic.” Dr. Miller chaired an American Heart Association (AHA) writing committee that published a scientific statement on triglycerides and CVD in the April 18, 2011 issue of Circulation. “There has been little consensus in the literature about the role of triglycerides in coronary disease,” he says. “There has been no detailed statement on triglycerides that has systematically reviewed both the pathophysiologic and clinical trial evidence to date. For this reason, the AHA felt it was necessary to educate healthcare providers about the importance of triglycerides as a biomarker of cardiovascular risk.” He adds that the 2011 AHA position statement analyzed more than 500 international studies from the past 30 years. Helpful Strategies in Reducing Triglycerides Dr. Miller says it is well known that dietary and other lifestyle interventions can help patients lose weight and have a strong effect on triglyceride levels. “These improvements also translate into salutary effects on systolic blood pressure and glucose, reduced insulin resistance, and systemic inflammation, thereby resulting in an improved metabolic profile.” According to the guidelines, substituting unsaturated dietary fats...
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