Advertisement
Assessing Arthritis in People With Diabetes

Assessing Arthritis in People With Diabetes

Arthritis is the most common cause of disability in the United States and is a barrier to physical activity. Recent research has suggested that arthritis may also increase the risk of diabetes. Some medications for treating arthritis can also decrease insulin sensitivity, thereby increasing diabetes risk. Physical activity is an important component of both diabetes and arthritis prevention and management. Gaining a Better Understanding of Arthritis Impact In a study published in Diabetes Care, my colleagues and I examined cross-sectional data from the National Health Interview Survey. We wanted to gain a better understanding of the burden and impact of arthritis among older adults with diabetes. By learning more about how these disease states are intertwined, clinicians can make informed decisions when selecting interventions so that they’re utilized appropriately. This data may also help with advancing policy and guidelines to ensure better delivery of healthcare.   According to our results, almost 50% of people with diabetes have arthritis and about 25% have arthritis-attributable activity limitation (AAAL). For people without diabetes, about 20% have arthritis and about 8% have AAAL. Our findings further support that arthritis among adults with diabetes significantly limits physical activity. Many are unable to realize the benefits of physical activity in managing their diabetes and preventing diabetes-related complications. The Effect of Arthritis on Diabetes Management Although it has already been established that arthritis is common among adults, our analysis sheds light on the effect of arthritis on physical activity limitation among those with both conditions. We hope our research will help clinicians and patients become aware that arthritis is a substantial barrier to physical activity and that...

Guidelines for Nutrition & Exercise in Cancer Survivors

In 2001, the American Cancer Society (ACS) first published an article summarizing the relatively small amount of scientific evidence regarding the impact of nutrition and physical activity among cancer survivors. Since that time, new studies have emerged, demonstrating the benefits of maintaining a healthy weight, getting adequate physical activity, and eating a healthy diet. The key benefits include reducing the chance of recurrence and increasing the likelihood of disease-free survival after a diagnosis. Based on this new and accumulating evidence, an expert panel convened by the ACS issued formal guidelines for cancer survivors for the first time in the CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. Encourage Regular Exercise The ACS update recommends that clinicians encourage survivors to participate in regular physical activity. Patients should aim to exercise at moderate intensity at least 150 minutes per week and perform strength training exercises at least 2 days per week. Clinicians need to encourage patients to avoid inactivity and return to normal daily activities as soon as possible following a diagnosis. However, in some cases, particular issues affect the ability of patients who are recovering from cancer treatment to exercise. The guidelines provide information on many of these issues and how these circumstances should be factored into the equation when recommending activities. Weight Management & Diet Among Cancer Survivors Many patients are overweight or obese when they are diagnosed with cancer, and there’s increasing evidence that obesity increases risks for cancer recurrence and reduces survival. Achieving and maintaining a healthy weight is another key recommendation in the 2012 guidelines. If cancer survivors are overweight or obese, they should be encouraged to limit...

Discussing New Cancer Prevention Guidelines

[xyz_lbx_custom_shortcode id=5] According to recent reports from national and international research teams, approximately one-third of all cancers can be prevented by maintaining a healthy weight, eating a healthy diet, and exercising regularly. Published studies have indicated that obesity plays a major role in cancer development through a number of biological mechanisms. Since the American Cancer Society (ACS) last published guidelines on nutrition and physical activity for cancer prevention in 2006, there has been mounting evidence addressing the role of obesity in the development of cancer. While it is not a new concept that daily exercise is important to helping prevent cancer, what has emerged in the literature is that prolonged sitting time (eg, watching television or sitting at the computer) also appears to significantly increase risks. Educate Patients on Cancer Prevention In the CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, the ACS published an update to the 2006 guidelines that focused on reducing cancer risk with healthy food choices and physical activity. “The new recommendations emphasize that any level of positive change in diet or exercise is a step in the right direction to encourage patients to achieve optimum weight and exercise levels,” says Elisa V. Bandera, MD, PhD, who was a coauthor of the guidelines. “The loss of only a few pounds for obese and overweight people is beneficial. Small changes may lead to bigger ones and further encourage people to start changing their lifestyle for the better.” Dr. Bandera says that clinicians should educate patients about the health risks associated with being overweight and obese and provide them with the recommendations outlined in the guidelines (Table 1). She...

Physical Activity Reduces Colon Cancer Risks

Australian investigators suggest that physical activity helps reduce the risk of proximal and distal colon cancers. In a study, the risk of proximal colon cancer was 27% lower among the most physically active participants when compared with the least active. Similar results were seen with risk for distal colon cancer. Abstract: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, October 22,...

Web-Based Intervention Gets Women Moving

A team of American researchers has found that a 12-week, web-based physical activity (PA) intervention appears to improve measures of PA and quality of life (QOL) among adult women. In the study, women aged 18 and older received 12 weekly PA modules and completed surveys on PA, QOL, and readiness for PA at registration. Significant improvements were observed in PA, stage of readiness for PA, BMI, and composite scores for energy and well-being. Among participants who reported no PA at baseline, 54.6% achieved some PA and another 9.1% achieved total compliance with PA guideline recommendations. Overall, guideline compliance increased from 15.8% to 21.4%. Abstract: American Journal of Cardiology, June 15,...
Page 1 of 212
[ HIDE/SHOW ]