Recent studies have indicated that femoropopliteal artery revascularization with paclitaxel drug-coated devices could increase the risk of long-term, all-cause mortality, as compared with non-drug coated devices. This study aims to investigate the differences in all-cause mortality between patients who underwent femoropopliteal artery revascularization with and without drug-coated devices.

This multicenter, nationwide, retrospective, cohort study included a total of 16,560 patients admitted at 1,883 hospitals for femoropopliteal artery revascularization. The outcomes of the use of drug-coated devices were compared with non-drug coated devices. The primary outcome of the study was all-cause mortality.

Of 16,560 patients included in the study, 9817 (59.3%) had diabetes, 8450 (51.0%) had critical limb ischemia (CLI), and 8222 (49.7%) currently or had previously used tobacco. The findings suggested that the use of drug-coated devices was associated with a lower cumulative incidence of all-cause mortality, as compared with non-drug coated devices (32.5% vs. 34.3%). However, multivariable adjustment indicated that drug-coated devices were not related to a difference in all-cause mortality as compared with non-drug-coated devices.

The research concluded that there were no significant differences in the rates of survival and mortality among patients who underwent femoropopliteal artery revascularization with drug-coated and non-drug-coated devices.

Ref: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamacardiology/fullarticle/2725047?resultClick=1