Despite being overrepresented in medicine overall, women continue to be underrepresented in urology. A more diversified urological staff had the potential to improve patient health outcomes. For a study, researchers provided a review of the hurdles that women experienced in urology at the student, resident, and attending levels, as well as proposed solutions to these difficulties. Although the number of women entering urology had grown since the first woman became a board-certified urologist in 1962, women continued to be underrepresented, advancing at a slower rate, and holding a tiny percentage of leadership roles. Women in urology and surgical areas, in general, confront a slew of hurdles and roadblocks that might be overcome in order to attract and retain more women in the field of urology. Recent initiatives by academic urologists and trainees alike provided optimism for improvement.

Women in urology confronted unique problems, such as fewer mentorship possibilities, harassment and bigotry, and ‘pigeonholing.’ Recent initiatives by academic urologists and trainees alike provided optimism for progress in attracting and retaining more women in the specialty. Among the initiatives was the American Urological Association’s public pledge to advocate for and nurture a diverse and inclusive environment in urology. A more diversified urological workforce has the potential to improve patient health outcomes, especially in areas with limited access to urological treatment.

Reference:link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11934-021-01074-6