Heart disease and stroke are still the leading two killers in the world; in the U.S.

The number of adults living with heart failure increased from about 5.7 million (2009-2012) to about 6.5 million (2011-2014), according to the American Heart Association’s 2017 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update.

Based on the latest statistics, the number of people diagnosed with heart failure, which means the heart is too weak to pump blood throughout the body, is projected to rise by 46 percent by 2030, resulting in more than 8 million people adults with heart failure.

In the latest statistics update, many major statistics did not change significantly.

Cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and stroke collectively remain the leading cause of death in the world and the United States. Heart disease and stroke are still the leading two killers in the world; in the U.S., heart disease ranks first and stroke fifth.


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Here are some key statistics, including the year when the most recent data was available:

  • Cardiovascular diseases were the most common cause of death in the world as of 2013, claiming about 17.3 million lives.
  • In the U.S., more than 1 in 3 adults (92.1 million adults) have cardiovascular diseases, accounting for 807,775 deaths in 2014.
  • About 790,000 people in the US have heart attacks each year. Of those, about 114,000 will die. In the U.S., about 795,000 adults experienced a new or recurrent stroke, accounting for nearly 133,000 deaths in 2014.
  • There were more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in the U.S., nearly 90 percent of them fatal.

Disparities in how these diseases affect different people continued, according to the update.

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