Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for November 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Hypnotherapy Beats Education for Relief of IBS Symptoms

FRIDAY, Nov. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), individual and group hypnotherapy are more effective than educational supportive therapy in relieving symptoms, according to a study published online Nov. 22 in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA to Update Medical Device Approvals Process

TUESDAY, Nov. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A major update of the United States’ system for approving medical devices was announced yesterday by the Food and Drug Administration.

CBS/AP News Article
More Information

FDA: Safe to Eat Romaine Lettuce Again, but Check Labels

TUESDAY, Nov. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In a statement released late yesterday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., announced that the agency was lifting its advisory against eating romaine lettuce, first put in place last Tuesday. At that point, the agency had not been able to narrow down the source of the tainted lettuce. But now the source seems to be “end-of-season” lettuce harvested somewhere in the Central Coast regions of central and northern California. And “harvesting of romaine lettuce from this region has [already] ended for the year,” Gottlieb noted.

More Information: FDA
More Information: CDC

Four Principles Underlie Patient and Family Partnership in Care

TUESDAY, Nov. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Patient and family partnership in care should include treatment of patients and families with dignity and respect, their active engagement in all aspects of care, and their contribution to the improvement of health care systems and education of health care professionals, according to a position paper published online Nov. 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Position Paper
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

ACA Coverage Substantial, but Did Not Impact Labor Markets

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Millions of workers gained insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) without adverse effects on labor markets, according to a report published by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Urban Institute.

Report: How Have Workers Fared Under the ACA?

Probiotics Show No Benefits for Pediatric Acute Gastroenteritis

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For children with acute gastroenteritis, probiotics show no significant benefit versus placebo, according to two studies published in the Nov. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text – Schnadower (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract/Full Text – Freedman (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Obesity Tied to Increased Risk for Early-Onset CRC in Women

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Obesity is associated with an increased risk for early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) among women, according to a study recently published in JAMA Oncology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required

FDA Approves Drug for Treatment of Travelers’ Diarrhea

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday announced it has approved Aemcolo (rifamycin), an antibacterial drug indicated for treating adult patients with travelers’ diarrhea caused by noninvasive strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli) without fever or blood in the stool.

More Information

IBD Disability Index for Self-Report Reliable, Valid

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Disability Index (IBD-DI) for self-report (IBD-DI-SR) is reliable and valid for measuring disability in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a study recently published online in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA: Another E. coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention along with health officials from various states are asking American consumers to avoid romaine lettuce due to an outbreak of Escherichia coli illness.

FDA Fast Facts
CDC Food Safety Alert

Prevalence of Food Allergy 7.6 Percent in U.S. Children

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The prevalence of food allergy (FA) is 7.6 percent among children in the United States, according to a study published online Nov. 19 in Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text

Obesity as a Teen Ups Risk for Later Pancreatic Cancer

FRIDAY, Nov. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Men and women who are obese as adolescents are at an increased risk for pancreatic cancer in adulthood, according to an study published online Nov. 12 in Cancer.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required )

CDC: 8.8 Percent Uninsured in U.S. in First Half of 2018

FRIDAY, Nov. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In the first six months of 2018, 8.8 percent of U.S. individuals of all ages were uninsured, which was not significantly different from 2017, according to a report published Nov. 15 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics.

Abstract/Full Text

Harms ID’d With Nonoperative Management of Appendicitis

THURSDAY, Nov. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Patients with uncomplicated appendicitis undergoing nonoperative management are more likely to have an appendicitis-associated readmission and to develop an abscess, although index hospitalization costs are lower compared with appendectomy, according to a study published online Nov. 14 in JAMA Surgery.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Name-Brand Medications Driving Spike in U.S. Drug Spending

THURSDAY, Nov. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Rising drug spending in the United States is being fueled by expensive name-brand prescription medicines, a new study shows.

NBC News Article
Blue Cross Blue Shield Report

Patient Experiences Shed Light on Diagnostic Errors

THURSDAY, Nov. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Data from patient- and family-reported error narratives indicate that problems related to patient-physician interactions are major contributors to diagnostic errors, according to a study published in the November issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

AMA to Collect Data on Suicide Among Doctors-in-Training

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — By collecting data on suicides by medical students, residents, and fellows, the American Medical Association hopes to identify ways to reduce suicides among doctors-in-training. The data collection policy was approved at a meeting yesterday.

More Information

2017 Hepatitis A Outbreaks Tied to Drug Use, Homelessness

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Investigations of hepatitis A outbreaks in four states in 2017 suggested a shift toward increasing person-to-person transmission of hepatitis A, according to research published in the Nov. 2 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Abstract/Full Text

Quantity of Opioids Prescribed Postop Linked to Consumption

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The quantity of opioids prescribed after surgery is associated with patient-reported opioid consumption, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in JAMA Surgery.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medicaid Expansion Approved in Three Republican-Leaning States

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Hundreds of thousands more low-income Americans could get health insurance after voters in three Republican-leaning states approved Medicaid expansion in the midterm elections.

CNBC Article

Colectomy Appears to Increase Later Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Patients who have the entire or left side of the colon removed show increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the 18 years following surgery, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in eLife.

Abstract/Full Text

Short Questionnaire IDs GI Disorders in Children With Autism

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A short parent questionnaire may be able to identify gastrointestinal disorders in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study published online Oct. 22 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Over Two Million People Living With Hep C From 2013 to 2016

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — During 2013 to 2016, more than two million people in the United States had current hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, according to a study published online Nov. 6 in Hepatology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Majority of Internists Still Have Financial Ties to Industry

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A majority of internists still report financial ties to industry, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Removing Appendix May Lower Risk for Parkinson’s Disease

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The normal human appendix seems to contain pathogenic forms of α-synuclein, which may impact the risk for developing Parkinson’s disease (PD), according to a study published online Oct. 31 in Science Translational Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Sign-Up Season Begins on HealthCare.gov

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The federal government website where Americans can sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act is up and running, officials said yesterday.

AP News Article
HealthCare.gov

Financial Conflicts of Interest Prevalent Among CPG Authors

THURSDAY, Nov. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — There is a high prevalence of financial conflicts of interest among authors of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) related to high-revenue medications and in gastroenterology, according to two research letters published online Oct. 29 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text – Khan (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract/Full Text – Combs (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

2011 to 2015 Saw Decline in Health Care-Associated Infections

THURSDAY, Nov. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — From 2011 to 2015, there was a reduction in the prevalence of health care-associated infections, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2018 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.
healthday