Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for October 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Some Weather Conditions Linked to Myocardial Infarction Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Certain weather conditions are associated with an increased risk for myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published online Oct. 24 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Link Between Statins, Non-CVD Outcomes Lacks Evidence

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) — There is a lack of convincing evidence for an association between statin use and non-cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes, according to a review published in the Oct. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Discharge Day Does Not Impact Readmission After Cardiac Sx

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For cardiac surgical patients, the likelihood of readmission has no association with day of discharge, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Few Smokers With PAD Receive Adequate Cessation Support

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — More than one-third of patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) are active smokers, yet few of them receive evidence-based smoking cessation interventions, according to a study published in the Oct. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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AMA Announces Initiative to Reinvent Physician Training

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The American Medical Association (AMA) today announced a new $15 million competitive grant initiative, the “Reimagining Residency” initiative, aimed at improving residency training.

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Pilot Studies May Shed Light on How to Treat Lymphedema

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Treatment with ketoprofen may improve the skin biology in lymphedema, with improvements noted in histopathology and skin thickness, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in JCI Insight.

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Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors May Up Lung CA Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) is associated with an increased risk for lung cancer compared with angiotensin receptor blockers, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the BMJ.

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Accepting Increased-Risk Donor Heart Tied to Higher Survival

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Acceptance of a heart from an increased-risk donor (IRD) is associated with a significant survival benefit, according to a research letter published in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Therapeutic Lifestyle Intervention in Church Helpful for BP Control

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A therapeutic lifestyle change (TLC) intervention plus motivational interviewing (MINT) sessions delivered in churches can reduce systolic blood pressure (BP) among blacks compared with health education (HE) alone, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Community Health Worker Intervention Beneficial

TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A standardized community health worker (CHW)-delivered intervention, Individual Management for Patient-Centered Targets, improves patient-perceived quality of care and reduces hospitalizations for low-income patients with chronic diseases, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Cardiac Stem Cell Trial Halted Due to Concerns About Fake Data

MONDAY, Oct. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A clinical trial assessing the use of stem cells to treat heart failure patients has been paused by the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) because it is based partly on what may be falsified or fabricated data from the laboratory of a Harvard Medical School-affiliated researcher.

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Many Hospitals Noncompliant With Record Request Regulations

MONDAY, Oct. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Among top-ranked U.S. hospitals, data reveal discrepancies in information provided to patients regarding medical records release processes as well as noncompliance with state and federal regulations, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in JAMA Network Open.

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Cardiac Implant Prices Higher in U.S. Than EU Countries

FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Cardiac implant prices are two to six times higher in the United States than in Germany, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Trump Administration Announces Plan to Cut Drug Prices

FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In an effort to cut high drug costs, the prices paid by Medicare for certain prescription drugs would be based on those in other advanced industrial nations, according to a proposal announced Oct. 25 by the Trump administration.

HHS Study
New York Times Article

Novel Troponin Assay, hs-cTnI Comparable in Ruling Out AMI

FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A single point-of-care troponin concentration measured on arrival to the emergency department (ED) with 15-minute turnaround time can accurately rule out acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to a study published online Oct. 17 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Oxygen Saturation Should Not Top 96 Percent in Acutely Ill

THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For acutely ill patients, an oxygen saturation of no more than 96 percent should be maintained, according to a clinical practice guideline published online Oct. 24 in the BMJ.

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Independent Links for Genetics, Lifestyle With Incident Stroke

THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Genetic and lifestyle factors are independently associated with incident stroke among men and women aged 40 to 73 years, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the BMJ.

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HEART Pathway Can Safely Identify Low-Risk ER Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Implementation of the HEART Pathway is associated with decreased hospitalizations, increased identification of myocardial infarction (MI) at the index visit, and a very low death and MI rate among low-risk emergency department patients with chest pain, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Pace of Change Has Accelerated in Alternative Payment Models

THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The impact of alternative payment models (APMs) on physician practices has been described in a study published by the RAND Corp. and the American Medical Association.

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Half of Women to Develop Stroke, Dementia, or Parkinsonism

THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) — One in two women and one in three men will develop dementia, stroke, or parkinsonism during their lifetime, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Tibia Lead Levels Linked to Risk of Resistant-Hypertension

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Tibia lead levels are associated with resistant-hypertension (HTN), according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Most Supplements Contain Prohibited Stimulants

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Many supplements contain one or more stimulants that have been the subject of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-issued public notices, according to a research letter published online Oct. 22 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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White House Unveils New Insurance Option for Small Firms

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A plan to allow small businesses to use tax-free accounts to provide health coverage for employees was announced today by the Trump administration.

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A-Fib Patients With Cancer Less Likely to See Cardiologist

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Atrial fibrillation (AF) patients with cancer are less likely to see a cardiologist and fill prescriptions for anticoagulants, according to a study published in the Oct. 16 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Periodontitis Linked to Higher BP in Adults With Treated HTN

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For adults with treated hypertension, periodontitis is associated with higher mean systolic blood pressure (BP) and with increased odds of unsuccessful hypertensive treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in Hypertension.

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Intensive SBP Tx Cuts Kidney Damage Biomarkers in Incident CKD

TUESDAY, Oct. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Patients with incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the setting of intensive systolic blood pressure (SBP) treatment have decreases rather than increases in kidney damage biomarkers, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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CT Abdominal Aortic Calcification Score Predicts CV Event Risk

MONDAY, Oct. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A computed tomography (CT)-based abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) score is a strong predictor of future cardiovascular events in asymptomatic patients, according to a study published online Oct. 2 in Radiology.

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Short Respiratory Event Duration Ups Mortality Risk in OSA

MONDAY, Oct. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For individuals with obstructive sleep apnea, those with short respiratory event duration have an increased risk for mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Percent Weight Regain Predicts Health Risks Post-Bariatric Surgery

MONDAY, Oct. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Measuring the percentage of weight regained following the maximum amount of weight lost after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery best predicts a patient’s risk for several serious health problems, according to a study published in the Oct. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Limited Success for Changing Diet and Exercise Among Nurses

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Implementation of a workplace intervention to change diet and physical activity (PA) behavior was partially successful among nurses, with the ability to change both diet and PA at the same time described as challenging, according to a study recently published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

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Aspirin, Anticoagulants Similarly Prevent VTE After TKA

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Among patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA), aspirin alone may provide protection against postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) that is similar to that of other anticoagulants, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in JAMA Surgery.

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Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair Benefits Some With Heart Failure

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Transcatheter mitral-valve repair results in a lower rate of hospitalization and lower all-cause mortality than medical therapy alone among patients with heart failure and moderate-to-severe secondary mitral regurgitation who remain symptomatic despite the use of guideline-directed medical therapy, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Sharp Drop in U.S. Life Expectancy Rankings by 2040

THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The United States will have the largest drop in life expectancy rankings of all high-income countries by 2040, a new study says.

CNN Article
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Procurement Requirements Drive Interoperability in Health Care IT

THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Interoperability of health care information technology (IT) must be improved to facilitate creation of a fully integrated health care system that can improve health and health care at lower cost, according to a report published by the National Academy of Medicine.

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Lung Cancer Deaths 28% Lower in California Than Rest of U.S.

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Annual lung cancer mortality was 28 percent lower in California than in the rest of the United States in 2013, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Cancer Prevention Research.

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Bariatric Sx Cuts Macrovascular Complications in Obesity, T2DM

TUESDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For patients with severe obesity and type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery is associated with a lower risk for macrovascular outcomes compared with not undergoing surgery, according to a study published in the Oct. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Harvard: Heart Researcher’s Papers Contain Fraudulent Data

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Dozens of scientific papers from the laboratory of well-known heart researcher Piero Anversa contain fraudulent data, according to a Harvard Medical School internal investigation.

Washington Post Article

CHF in Pregnancy Up for Cancer Survivors With Cardiac Toxicity

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The incidence of congestive heart failure (CHF) during pregnancy is 31 percent among women with a history of cardiotoxicity associated with cancer treatment, according to a study published in the Oct. 23 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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High Risk for Readmission for Takotsubo Syndrome

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Patients with Takotsubo syndrome (TTS), which is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction with symptoms and electrocardiogram changes mimicking acute myocardial infarction (AMI), have lower mortality during the index admission than AMI patients but are frequently readmitted within 30 days, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the European Heart Journal – Quality of Care & Clinical Outcomes.

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β-Blockers in 1st Trimester Do Not Up Congenital Malformations

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Maternal use of β-blockers in the first trimester of pregnancy is not associated with a large increase in the risk for overall or cardiac congenital malformations, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Without Medicaid Expansion, Poor Patients Forgo Medical Care

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Doing without medical care is much more common among low-income residents of states that have not expanded Medicaid than among low-income people in other states, according to a Government Accountability Office report.

AP News Article

Active Pharmaceuticals ID’d in >700 Dietary Supplements

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Dietary supplements often include active pharmaceuticals, even after warnings from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in JAMA Network Open.

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High Variability in Metabolic Measures May Up Mortality

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) — High variability in metabolic parameters is associated with increased risk for mortality and cardiovascular events, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in Circulation.

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Multicomponent Intervention Can Reduce Sitting Time at Work

FRIDAY, Oct. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A multicomponent intervention (Stand More At [SMArT] Work) can reduce sitting time over the short, medium, and long terms, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in The BMJ.

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Skills-Based Intervention Did Not Cut Systolic BP After Stroke, TIA

FRIDAY, Oct. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A culturally tailored, skills-based educational intervention did not reduce systolic blood pressure at one year after stroke/transient ischemic attack, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in JAMA Neurology.

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CDC: Many Children With Heart Conditions Have Special Needs

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Children with past and current heart conditions have more special health care needs compared with children without heart conditions, according to research published in the Sept. 29 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Poor Outcomes for Hispanic Infants With Congenital Heart Dz

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For live-born infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) and d-transposition of the great arteries (TGA), Hispanic ethnicity is associated with poor outcome, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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On a Given Day, 36.6 Percent of U.S. Adults Eat Fast Food

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Overall, 36.6 percent of U.S. adults consumed fast food on a given day during 2013 to 2016, according to an October data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics.

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Wall Thickness Measured by MRI More Consistently Linked to CVD

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Common carotid artery (CCA) wall thickness measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more consistently associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes than intima-media thickness measured by ultrasound, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in Radiology.

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Atrial Fibrillation Tied to Higher Dementia Risk in Older Adults

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with a faster global cognitive decline and an increased risk for dementia in older people, though anticoagulants may reduce dementia risk in AF patients, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in Neurology.

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Aetna-CVS Merger Approved

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A $69 billion merger between health insurer Aetna and pharmacy manager CVS Health has been approved, according to the U.S. Justice Department.

The New York Times Article

ADA, EASD Issue New Recommendations for T2DM

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Recommendations for the management of type 2 diabetes have been updated, according to a consensus report by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) published online Oct. 5 in Diabetes Care.

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Intensive BP Therapy in Diabetes May Lower Risk for CV Events

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Intensive blood pressure (BP) therapy is associated with significantly lower risk for cardiovascular events based on data reweighted to better reflect the U.S. adult population with diabetes, according to a study published in the Sept. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Childhood Obesity Persists Into Adolescence

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Greater weight gain in early childhood often carries over to overweight and obesity in adolescence, according to a study published in the Oct. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Minority Residents Experience Burdens Linked to Race/Ethnicity

TUESDAY, Oct. 9 2018 (HealthDay News) — Minority residents describe burdens associated with race/ethnicity, including microaggressions and bias on a daily basis, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in JAMA Network Open.

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Application of Blood Pressure Guidelines Ups Treatment

TUESDAY, Oct. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Implementation of the 2017 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) blood pressure guideline would direct initiation and intensification of antihypertensive medication treatment to adults at high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, according to a study published in the Sept. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Industry-Funded Trials Often Involve Employees in Studies

FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Industry employees are often involved in the design, conduct, and reporting of industry-funded trials in high-impact journals, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in The BMJ.

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Models Predict Intracerebral Hemorrhage Growth

FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Models using four or five predictors have acceptable to good discrimination for determining additional intracerebral hemorrhage growth in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage, according to a review published in the October issue of The Lancet Neurology.

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No Increase in In-Hospital, Post-Discharge Death With HRRP

FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Announcement and implementation of the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) was not associated with increases in in-hospital or post-discharge mortality after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or pneumonia, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in JAMA Network Open.

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Daily Drinking Associated With Increased Mortality Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Daily drinking, even at low levels, may be detrimental to one’s health, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Sexual Harassment, Assault Tied to Women’s Health Issues

FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Sexual harassment and sexual assault among midlife women are associated with poorer physical and mental health, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Morbidity, Mortality Up for Youth With CHD Presenting to ED

FRIDAY, Oct. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Children with congenital heart disease (CHD) presenting to the emergency department have increased rates of inpatient admission and mortality and higher emergency department charges than those without CHD, according to a study published in the Oct. 9 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Price Hikes Noted in Small Subset of Generic Drugs

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A small but growing subset of generic drugs experienced sudden large price increases from 2007 to 2013, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Tips Provided for Budgeting in Medical Residency

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Medical residents should start budgeting and save for the future, according to an article published in the American Medical Association AMA Wire.

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Three-Quarters of Health Care Workers Got Flu Shot Last Year

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Just over three-quarters of health care personnel received a flu vaccine last season, according to research published in the Sept. 28 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Residual Vein Obstruction Down With Compression After DVT

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The likelihood of residual vein obstruction (RVO) is reduced with immediate compression after diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in Blood.

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Sleep Duration, Stroke Link Varies With Race, Sex

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The association of sleep duration with incident stroke varies by race and sex, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Neurology.

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Medicare Patient Readmit Rates Higher in Proprietary Hospitals

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Among Medicare patients with six major diseases, readmission rates are higher for those receiving care in proprietary hospitals compared with government or nonprofit hospitals, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in PLOS ONE.

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Elevated Blood Pressure Linked to Aortic Valve Disease

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Long-term exposure to elevated blood pressure (BP) is associated with increased risk for aortic valve stenosis (AS) and aortic regurgitation (AR), according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the European Heart Journal.

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Family History Linked to Early-Onset A-Fib in Minorities

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Probands of African or Hispanic/Latino descent with early-onset atrial fibrillation (EOAF) are more likely than European Americans to have a first-degree relative with AF, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in JAMA Network Open.

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Uninsured Rate at 8.8 Percent in First Quarter of 2018

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In the first quarter of 2018, the uninsured rate was 8.8 percent, not significantly different from a year earlier, according to a report released Aug. 29 by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Preventable Cardiovascular Events Are Big Economic Burden

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Preventable cardiovascular events place a considerable health and economic burden on the United States, according to research published in the Sept. 7 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Soft Drinks Account for One-Fifth of Youth Beverage Consumption

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Despite dietary recommendations, soft drinks make up about one-fifth of total beverage consumption by U.S. youth, according to a September data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Southern Dietary Pattern Mediates Racial Difference in HTN

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For black men and women, the Southern dietary pattern is the largest mediating factor for differences in the incidence of hypertension, according to a study published in the Oct. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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For Employer-Based Plans, Spending Across Services Steady

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Despite large health policy changes, the distribution of spending across service areas has remained fairly consistent over the past 10 years for those enrolled in employer-sponsored insurance, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Blacks Less Likely to Receive Guideline-Based NSTEMI Therapy

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Black patients have a lower likelihood of receiving guideline-based therapies for non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), according to a study published online Sept. 20 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Number of Health-Related Data Breaches Increasing

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The number of health data breaches has steadily increased since 2010, according to a research letter published in the Sept. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Interviews Can Help Ensure Physician Candidates Fit Culture

TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) — In preparing to interview to hire a new physician, practices must understand their own cultures, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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More Non-Elderly Americans Uninsured in 2017 Versus 2016

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — From 2016 to 2017, there was an increase in the number of uninsured non-elderly Americans, according to a report published by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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Risk of Venous Thromboembolism Recurrence High

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — The risk of recurrence after incident venous thromboembolism is high, particularly among patients with cancer-related venous thromboembolism, according to a study published in the September issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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Readmission, Death Risk Higher in COPD With Comorbidities

MONDAY, Oct. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who have comorbidities are more likely to experience readmission or mortality and less likely to receive beneficial treatments, according to a study published in the September issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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