STI prevention needs among urban refugee and displaced youth are understudied. The study was done with the purpose to explore factors associated with the STI prevention cascade.

445 Participants included young women and young men. Less than half were aware of community STI services. One-quarter reported lifetime STI testing. Of these, 39.5% reported a lifetime STI diagnosis. In multivariable analyses among young women, age, lifetime sex partners, and lower adolescent sexual and reproductive health (SRH)-related stigma were associated with STI services awareness; and age, lower adolescent SRH-related stigma, and food security was associated with STI testing. Among young men, time in Uganda and lower HIV-related stigma were associated with STI services awareness; and age, condom self-efficacy, and increased adolescent SRH-related stigma were associated with testing. Lifetime sex partners, lower condom self-efficacy, and lower adolescent SRH-related stigma were associated with lifetime STI diagnosis.

The findings of this study included that social-ecological factors including stigma were associated with STI testing and diagnosis among young urban refugees. Gender, age, and stigma-tailored strategies can advance the STI prevention cascade among urban young refugees.

Reference: https://srh.bmj.com/content/46/3/192