Asthma exacerbations in children and adults are linked to respiratory infections, including influenza, so annual influenza vaccine is recommended as a precaution for all asthma patients. The effectiveness of ICS care in asthmatics is a source of concern. In asthmatics, the assembly of influenza antibodies has been demonstrated. Cellular immunity, on the other hand, is poorly known. The study’s aim was to compare asthmatic and healthy people’s humoral and cellular immune responses to influenza vaccine.

 Twenty-five asthmatic patients and 25 healthy adults from the Hospital General de Mexico’s Allergy and Clinical Immunology Service were included in the study.

Twenty-five asthmatic patients and 25 healthy adults from the Hospital General de Mexico’s Allergy and Clinical Immunology Service were included in the study.

The hemagglutination inhibition test was used to evaluate influenza-specific antibodies, and flow cytometry was used to determine influenza-specific memory B, TCD4+, and TCD8+ lymphocytes before, 4 months during, and 12 months after immunization with influenza vaccine. Many of the asthmatic patients were given inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). Both groups had identical mean titers for all influenza serotypes, and seropositivity as well as the cellular immunologic response increased over time and were comparable.

Influenza vaccination in asthmatic patients receiving immunotherapy and ICS resulted in protective antibody levels and cellular immunity over time, similar to that seen in healthy people.

Reference: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21645515.2020.1759995