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#PWChat – 1-Year Follow-Up on Healthcare Under President Trump

#PWChat – 1-Year Follow-Up on Healthcare Under President Trump

Join us Wednesday, January 31 at 3:00pm ET for a live, interactive tweetchat with Linda Girgis, MD, on the impact on US healtchare of President Trump’s first year in office. Topics to be discussed are subject to change but will likely include: With TrumpCare as we knew it a year ago essentially dead, where we now stand. Reactions to Pres. Trump’s touting in his 1st State of the Union address (Jan 30, 2018) of the FDA’s approval of more drugs last year than any other year on record, his plan to decrease prescription drug prices, and his goal of getting more terminally ill patients into trials of experimental drugs. The impact on the US healthcare systems as a whole, as well as on patients and healthcare professionals specifically, of Alex Azar taking office as the Secretary of HHS. The pros and Cons of Paul Ryan’s Patient’s Choice Act, where it stands, and what would result if it came to be law. What will come of Pres Trump’s administration allowing states (as of January 11) to impose work requirements on Medicaid recipients. What will result from the Obamacare tax on those who don’t get health insurance being repealed with Pres Trump’s Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. An executive order signed by Pres Trump on Oct 12, 2017 that modified Obamacare in 5  ways. What directing R. Alexander Acosta (Secretary of US Dept of Labor) to expand access to association health plans means and what will come of it. What will come of requests under the executive order for Acosta to ease restrictions on short-term health plans and allow employers to use...
Calling Responsible Parties to Task for their Role in the Opioid Epidemic

Calling Responsible Parties to Task for their Role in the Opioid Epidemic

In October 2017, President Donald Trump announced that the opioid epidemic is a public health emergency. Earlier the same week, the FDA declared that since 2001, prescription drugs (largely opioids) have been the greatest cause of overdose deaths. In fact, over the past 6 years, there have been more deaths from overdoses than guns, cars, suicides, and murder. How did we get to this point? The first use of opioids dates back to approximately 3500 BC, when the opium poppy was cultivated in lower Mesopotamia and the Sumerians referred to it as “Hul Gil” or “joy plant”. Its euphoric properties were soon passed on to the Assyrians, Babylonians, and Egyptians. In 1100 BC, it was noted that the “peoples of the sea” on the Island of Cyprus crafted special knives for harvesting opium, and they smoked it before the fall of Troy. Hippocrates, in 460 BC, first noted its usefulness as a narcotic in treating diseases. There are many references to opium in ancient times, when it was used as an anesthetic and even for ritual purposes. The ancient Egyptians, Indians, and Romans used it to treat pain, often during surgical procedures. It was a highly traded commodity for many centuries, and its use spread throughout Europe and Asia. Opium first arrived in the US in the 1620’s aboard the Mayflower. It was most likely carried in the form of laudanum (an opium/alcohol tincture first created by Paracelsus) and used as a pain killer, anti-diarrheal, and sedative. It was very useful in early frontier times during outbreaks of smallpox, dysentery, and cholera. By the time the American Revolution occurred,...
American Stroke Association, Jan. 24-26

American Stroke Association, Jan. 24-26

The American Heart Association’s International Stroke Conference The annual International Stroke Conference of the American Heart Association was held from Jan. 24 to 26 in Houston and attracted nearly 4,000 participants from around the world, including cerebrovascular research and practice experts. The conference featured more than 1,500 presentations that emphasized basic, clinical, and translational medicine, and provided insight into the prevention, management, and treatment of stroke. In one study, Devin L. Brown, M.D., of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues performed portable sleep apnea tests on approximately 850 ischemic stroke patients about 13 days after stroke onset within the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi project. “We found that our physiological measure of sleep apnea (the respiratory event index) was associated with the combined outcome of post-stroke deaths and recurrent stroke at 30 days after stroke,” Brown said. “This association was present even after accounting for other factors that could have been responsible for the relationship.” In terms of recurrent stroke alone, the investigators found that the physiological measure of sleep apnea was associated with stroke recurrence both early and late after stroke (divided at the 18-month post-stroke time point) in non-Hispanic whites. However, in Mexican Americans, the investigators found that sleep apnea was associated with stroke recurrence only before 18 months, not after. “Although it has been known that sleep apnea is very common after stroke and appears to be associated with poor stroke outcomes, no prospective data have been available about the relationship between sleep apnea and recurrent stroke and mortality from population-based studies, large samples, or ethnically diverse populations,” Brown said. “Based on...
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