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Assessing Arthritis in People With Diabetes

Assessing Arthritis in People With Diabetes
Author Information (click to view)

Yiling J. Cheng, MD, PhD

Division of Diabetes Translation
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Yiling J. Cheng, MD, PhD, has indicated to Physician’s Weekly that he has or has had no financial interests to report. 

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Yiling J. Cheng, MD, PhD (click to view)

Yiling J. Cheng, MD, PhD

Division of Diabetes Translation
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Yiling J. Cheng, MD, PhD, has indicated to Physician’s Weekly that he has or has had no financial interests to report. 

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Arthritis is the most common cause of disability in the United States and is a barrier to physical activity. Recent research has suggested that arthritis may also increase the risk of diabetes. Some medications for treating arthritis can also decrease insulin sensitivity, thereby increasing diabetes risk. Physical activity is an important component of both diabetes and arthritis prevention and management.

Gaining a Better Understanding of Arthritis Impact

In a study published in Diabetes Care, my colleagues and I examined cross-sectional data from the National Health Interview Survey. We wanted to gain a better understanding of the burden and impact of arthritis among older adults with diabetes. By learning more about how these disease states are intertwined, clinicians can make informed decisions when selecting interventions so that they’re utilized appropriately. This data may also help with advancing policy and guidelines to ensure better delivery of healthcare.

Assessing-Arthritis-Callout

 

According to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Support Network (RASN), almost 50% of people with diabetes have arthritis and about 25% have arthritis-attributable activity limitation (AAAL). For people without diabetes, about 20% have arthritis and about 8% have AAAL. Our findings further support that arthritis among adults with diabetes significantly limits physical activity. Many are unable to realize the benefits of physical activity in managing their diabetes and preventing diabetes-related complications.

The Effect of Arthritis on Diabetes Management

Although it has already been established that arthritis is common among adults, our analysis sheds light on the effect of arthritis on physical activity limitation among those with both conditions. We hope our research will help clinicians and patients become aware that arthritis is a substantial barrier to physical activity and that it may limit how diabetes is managed and how diabetic complications are prevented. Our data may stimulate efforts by clinicians to promote physical activity in ways that are suitable to people with both conditions.

In future research, efforts are needed to learn more about specific types and amounts of physical activity that can benefit people living with both arthritis and diabetes. Research is also needed to discover whether arthritis influences the future development of diabetes among adults at high risk for the disease, especially those with pre-diabetes. Current estimates suggest that 79 million American adults aged 20 or older have prediabetes. Considering that physical activity is an important part of lifestyle interventions, understanding any effects of arthritis

Readings & Resources (click to view)

American Diabetes Association. Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes–2013. Diabetes Care. 2013;36:S1-S110.

Cheng YJ, Imperatore G, Caspersen CJ, Gregg EW, Albright AL, Helmick CG. Prevalence of diagnosed arthritis and arthritis-attributable activity limitation among adults with and without diagnosed diabetes: United States, 2008-2010. Diabetes Care. 2012;35:1686-1691. Available at: http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/35/8/1686.full.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The arthritis pain reliever. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/pa_overview.htm.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Self-management education. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/interventions/self_manage.htm.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Diabetes prevention. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/consumer/prevent.htm.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Arthritis as a potential barrier to physical activity among adults with diabetes: United States, 2005 and 2007. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2008;57:486-489.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Arthritis and diabetes. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/data_statistics/comorbidities-diabetes.htm.

2008 Physical activity guidelines for Americans [article online], 2008. Available at www.health.gov/PAGuidelines.

Cerin E, Leslie E, Sugiyama T, Owen N. Perceived barriers to leisure-time physical activity in adults: an ecological perspective. J Phys Act Health. 2010;7:451-459.

1 Comment

  1. Good article.People with diabetes and arthritis often cite concerns about joint pain as a reason to avoid physical activity. Strengthening and low-impact cardio exercises, such as walking, swimming, or biking help to reduce the pressure over joints. I saw similar useful articles on Healthclues website.

    Reply

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