There is an unmet need for new efficacious, well-tolerated, acute treatments for migraine in adolescents. Remote electrical neuromodulation (REN) is a novel, non-pharmacological treatment, that provides significant symptom relief with good tolerability. The current post-hoc analysis compared the efficacy of REN to that of standard-care medications, for the acute treatment of migraine in adolescents.
Within-participant post-hoc analysis of data from a clinical trial.
Data from a clinical trial.
Data from 35 adolescent participants was analyzed.
Efficacy was compared between a run-in phase in which attacks were treated with standard-care medications (triptans or over-the-counter medications), and an intervention phase in which attacks were treated with REN. Efficacy was compared within-participant using McNemar’s test, at four endpoints (two hours post-treatment): single-treatment pain freedom and pain relief, and consistency of pain freedom and pain relief (defined as response in at least 50% of the available first four treatments).
At two hours post-treatment, pain freedom was achieved by 37.1% of the participants with REN, vs. 8.6% of the participants with medications (p = 0.004). Pain relief was achieved by 71.4% with REN, vs. 57.1% with medications (p = 0.225). Consistency of pain freedom was achieved by 40% with REN, vs. 8.6% with medications (p < 0.001). Consistency of pain relief was achieved by 80.0% with REN, vs. 57.2% with medications (p = 0.033).
Our results suggest that REN may have higher efficacy than certain standard-care medications for the acute treatment of migraine in adolescents. A larger scale, blinded, comparative effectiveness and tolerability study is needed.

© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine.