The relationship between physicians and pharmaceutical companies has caused the medical community to question the degree to which pharmaceutical interactions and incentives can influence physicians’ prescribing habits. Our study aimed to analyze whether a change in institutional policy that restricted the availability of in-office samples for patients resulted in any measurable change in the prescribing habits of faculty physicians in the Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery at the University of South Florida (USF)(Tampa, Florida). Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for common dermatology diagnoses-acne vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, onychomycosis, psoriasis, and rosacea-before and after the pharmaceutical policy changes, and the prescribed medications were recorded. These medications were then categorized as brand name, generic, and over-the-counter (OTC). Statistical analysis using a mixed effects ordinal logistic regression model accounting for baseline patient characteristics was conducted to determine if a difference in prescribing habits occurred.

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PubMed