Although the impact of epilepsy on expressive language is heavily discussed, researched, and scientifically grounded, a limited volume of research points in the opposite direction. What about the causal relationship between disorder-related language activities and epileptic seizures? What are the possible diagnostic dilemmas that experts in the field of speech-language pathology, neurology, and related fields face? How far has research gone in investigating psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, the misdiagnosis of which can be a thorny issue for clinicians and a detrimental factor for the patients’ health? In order to address these questions, the study at hand focuses on a common, ever-intensified (by the COVID-19 pandemic) speech disorder-stuttering, and explores the pathophysiological and psychogenic background of the phenomenon. It also looks at the role of stuttering as a contributing factor to the appearance of epileptic seizures, in the hope of drawing attention to the complexity and importance of precise detection of stuttering-induced epilepsy, as a specific subcategory of language-induced epilepsy.