The purpose was to explore the value of high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) in predicting long-term clinical outcomes for stroke patients. The platelet reactivity was assayed after being treated with either 75 mg clopidogrel or 100 mg aspirin daily with VerifyNow System in stroke patients. HTPR for clopidogrel was defined as PRU ≥ 208, and that for aspirin was defined as ARU ≥ 550. CYP2C19 genotyping was performed using the Sequenom MassARRAY iPLEX platform. The primary endpoint was a composite of recurrent ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, or ischemic vascular death. The safety endpoint was bleeding. In the clopidogrel group, among 345 patients recruited, 174 of them were categorized as HTPR. A total of 270 patients were followed up for 54 months. There was a significant association between HTPR and the primary endpoint (HR 2.13 [95% CI, 1.43-3.15], p < 0.001). Among the 314 participants genotyped for CYP2C19, 187 (59.6%) were classified as CYP2C19 loss-of-function allele carriers. Patients with at least 1 loss-of-function allele were more likely to present with HTPR (OR 2.61 [95%CI, 1.43-4.77], p = 0.008), and had a higher risk of the primary endpoint (HR 2.05 [95% CI, 1.30, 3.25], p = 0.002). In the aspirin group, among 140 patients recruited, 28 of them were categorized as HTPR. A total of 121 patients were followed up for 30 months. Similarly, there was a significant association between HTPR and the primary endpoint (HR 3.28 [95% CI, 1.52-7.71], p = 0.002). HTPR is an independent risk factor for ischemic events during long-term follow-up in stroke patients. Platelet function testing is helpful to evaluate the effect of antiplatelet therapy for stroke patients.
© 2021. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.