Epidemiological evidence on the relationship between lipid profile and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in young adults remains insufficient. Thus, we sought to explore the association of lipid profile with subsequent CVD among young adults. Medical records of 1,451,997 young adults (20-49 years old) without prior history of CVD and not taking lipid lowering medications were extracted from the Japan Medical Data Center, a nationwide epidemiological database. We conducted multivariable Cox regression analyses to identify the association between lipid profile and the subsequent risk of CVD and used multiple imputation for missing data on body mass index, waist circumference, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cigarette smoking in our database. The mean age was 39.0±7.4 years, and 58.5% were men. After a mean follow-up of 1,148 ± 893 days, myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, stroke, and heart failure developed in 1,638 (0.1%), 15,887 (1.1%), 5,593 (0.4%), and 14,351 (1.0%) individuals, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression analyses including covariates after multiple imputation for missing values demonstrated that LDL-C ≥ 140 mg/dL, HDL-C < 40 mg/dL, and triglycerides ≥ 150 mg/dL were independently associated with the incidence of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, and heart failure. However, they were not associated with the incidence of stroke. Multivariable Cox regression analyses including the number of abnormal lipid profiles and covariates showed that the incidence of myocardial infarction, angina, and heart failure increased stepwise with the number of abnormal lipid profiles. However, the number of abnormal lipid profiles was not associated with the subsequent risk of stroke. In conclusion, the comprehensive analysis of a nationwide epidemiological database demonstrated a close relationship between lipid profile and subsequent CVD, suggesting the importance of maintaining an optimal lipid profile for the primary prevention of CVD in young generations.
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