To investigate the mental health of clinical first-line medical staff in COVID-19 epidemic and provide theoretical basis for psychological intervention. The mental health status of the first-line medical staff was investigated by Self-rating Anxiety Acale (SAS) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Self-rating Scale(PTSD-SS). From February 7 to 14, 2020, 246 medical staff were investigated who participated in the treatment of COVID-19 using cluster sampling , and received 230 responses, with a recovery rate of 93.5%. The incidence of anxiety in medical staff was 23.04% (53/230), and the score of SAS was (42.91 ± 10.89). Among them, the incidence of severe anxiety, moderate anxiety and mild anxiety were 2.17% (5/230), 4.78% (11/230) and 16.09% (37/230), respectively. The incidence of anxiety in female medical staff was higher than that in male [25.67% (48/187) 11.63% (5/43), =-2.008, =0.045], the score of SAS in female medical staff was higher than that in male [(43.78±11.12) (39.14 ± 9.01), =-2.548, =0.012]. The incidence of anxiety in nurses was higher than that in doctors [26.88% (43/160) 14.29% (10/70), =-2.066, =0.039], and the score of SAS in nurses was higher than that in doctors [(44.84±10.42) (38.50±10.72), =-4.207, <0.001]. The incidence of stress disorder in medical staff was 27.39% (63/230), and the score of PTSD-SS was (42.92 ± 17.88). The score of PTSD-SS in female medical staff was higher than that of male [(44.30±18.42) (36.91 ± 13.95), =-2.472, =0.014]. In COVID-19 epidemic, the incidence of anxiety and stress disorder is high among medical staff. Medical institutions should strengthen the training of psychological skills of medical staff. Special attention should be paid to the mental health of female nurses.
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