The emergence of microinvasive glaucoma surgeries (MIGS) has expanded glaucoma management options. Resident experience with these novel procedures is unclear as no residency minimums exist for them, nor are they part of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) procedure logs. The purpose of this study was to assess resident experience with MIGS in ACGME ophthalmology residency programs across the United States.
This was a cross-sectional survey study of resident MIGS experience. A survey was mailed to program directors of ACGME-accredited ophthalmology residency programs (N = 118) in January 2017. Descriptive analyses were used to characterize the respondent demographics. Chi-square, paired t-tests, and McNemar’s tests were used to analyze the geographical distribution and frequency of MIGS experience.
A total of 30 out of 118 (25%) residency program directors across all geographic regions responded. Most incorporated both MIGS lecture (87%) and wet lab (73%) didactics into their curriculum. Only 27% felt that MIGS should be part of ACGME requirements. The most common MIGS taught were iStent (70%), endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (50%), and trabectome (40%). Few residents had completed MIGS procedures as the primary surgeon by graduation. Eleven out of 30 program directors (37%) did not feel that the experience was adequate for independent practice.
This study suggests that residents are exposed to some MIGS procedures during training, but program directors did not feel that the experience was adequate for independent practice. Further research is necessary to understand the barriers to integrating MIGS training into residency programs.

© 2020 Yim et al.

References

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