The aim of this study was to determine the impact of age on radiation complications after plaque radiotherapy and prophylactic intravitreal bevacizumab for uveal melanoma.
Retrospective cohort study.
Retrospective single-center study of plaque-irradiated uveal melanoma with prophylactic intravitreal bevacizumab at 4-month intervals from July 2000 to January 2018.
Of 1131 eyes in 1131 patients, age was <50 years (n = 231), 50 to 70 years (n = 657), or >70 years (n = 243). Comparison by age category (<50 vs 50-70 vs >70 years) revealed the oldest group presenting with greatest tumor basal diameter (11.3 vs 11.3 vs 12.1 mm, P = 0.03) and worst visual acuity (20/40 vs 20/40 vs 20/50, P = 0.02). After plaque (mean follow-up 40 vs 42 vs 32 months, P < 0.001), radiation complications were most common in the youngest age group, including maculopathy (48% vs 39% vs 28%, P < 0.001), extramacular retinopathy (30% vs 25% vs 16%, P = 0.002), and papillopathy (21% vs 18% vs 12%, P = 0.03). The youngest age group had the highest Kaplan-Meier estimated 48-month cumulative probability for radiation maculopathy (62% vs 46% vs 47%, P = 0.001), extramacular retinopathy (36% vs 34% vs 29%, P = 0.03), and papillopathy (29% vs 26% vs 22%, P = 0.13). On subanalysis, the youngest age group had increased 48-month risk of developing radiation maculopathy when compared with the middle [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.5, P = 0.001] and older (HR = 1.6, P = 0.005) age groups and increased 48-month risk of developing extramacular radiation retinopathy compared with the older age group (HR = 1.5, P = 0.04).
After plaque radiotherapy for uveal melanoma and prophylactic intravitreal bevacizumab at 4-month intervals, patients younger than 50 years old have an increased 48-month risk of radiation maculopathy.