WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2022 (HealthDay News) — A remotely delivered hypertension and cholesterol management program is effective for reducing blood pressure (BP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in JAMA Cardiology.

Alexander J. Blood, M.D., from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and colleagues implemented and evaluated a remote hypertension and cholesterol management program among 10,803 patients across a diverse health network (3,658 with hypertension; 8,103 with cholesterol; and 958 with both). A total of 1,266 patients requested education only; other enrolled patients received education, home BP device integration, and medication titration. Overall, 424,482 BP readings and 139,263 laboratory reports were collected.

The researchers found that the mean clinic BP at six and 12 months after enrollment decreased by 8.7/3.8 and 9.7/5.2 mm Hg, respectively, for those engaged in remote medication management. The corresponding changes in BP were −1.5/−0.7 and +0.2/−1.9 mm Hg in the education-only cohort. Patients in remote medication management experienced a mean reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol of 35.4 and 37.5 mg/dL at six and 12 months, respectively, in the lipids program. The mean reductions in the education-only cohort were 9.3 and 10.2 mg/dL, respectively. The rates of enrollment and reductions in BP and lipids were similar across racial, ethnic, and primary language groups.

“Patients want innovative solutions to more easily engage with the health system,” a coauthor said in a statement. “Our program provides strong evidence that remote care can work and can make a difference in patients’ lives.”

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry; the work was partially sponsored by AllWays Health Partners.

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