With improvements in the outcome of treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), other diseases may account for a high death rate after surgery in patients with stage I NSCLC. In the present study, we analysed the associations between the clinical factors and non-cancer death after surgery in these patients.
The records of 514 patients with stage I NSCLC who underwent surgery were retrospectively reviewed; a proportional hazards model for the subdistribution of a competing risk was conducted to define the risk factors for non-cancer death.
The mean patient age was 67 years. A total of 367 patients (71%) underwent bilobectomy or lobectomy while 147 (29%) underwent sublobar resection. The pathological stage was IA in 386 (75%) and IB in 128 (25%) patients. Three patients (0.6%) died within 90 days after surgery, and 108 (21%) experienced postoperative complications. Until the time of writing this report, 83 patients had died during the follow-up. The cause of death was primary lung cancer in 38 (46%) patients and other diseases in 45 (54%) patients, including non-cancer causes in 29 patients, such as pneumonia, cardiac death and cerebral stroke. According to a multivariable competing risk analysis for non-cancer death age (≥70 years), sex (male), body mass index (BMI <18.5), postoperative complications and % forced expiratory volume in 1 s (<80) were identified as risk factors for postoperative non-cancer death.
Advanced age (≥70 years), male sex, low BMI (<18.5), postoperative complications and low preoperative % forced expiratory volume in 1 s (<80) were found to be the risk factors for postoperative non-cancer death after surgery in patients with stage I NSCLC.

© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

References

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