The coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak has spread worldwide and has resulted in hospital restrictions. The perceived impact of these practices on patients undergoing essential surgeries is less understood.
Adult (≥18 years) patients who underwent medically necessary surgical procedures spanning multiple surgical specialties from March 23, 2020, to April 24, 2020, during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic were identified as eligible for a phone survey. Survey responses were analyzed using a mixed-methods approach involving descriptive statistics and thematic analysis of coded and annotated survey results.
Of the 212 patients who underwent medically necessary surgical procedures during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, the majority of these patients were male (61.3%), White (83.5%), married or with a domestic partner (68.9%), and underwent oncologic procedures (69.3%). Of the 46 patients (21.7%) who completed the survey, the majority of these patients indicated that coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic restrictions had no impact on their inpatient hospital stay and were satisfied with their decision to proceed with surgery. Severity of patient condition (44.4%), the risk/benefit discussion with the surgeon (24.4%), and coronavirus disease 2019 education and testing (19.5%) were the most important factors in proceeding with surgery during the pandemic; 34.4% of patients said their inpatient postoperative course was negatively affected by the lack of visitors.
Medically necessary, time-sensitive surgical procedures, as determined by the surgeon, can be performed during a pandemic with good patient satisfaction provided there is an appropriate discussion between the surgeon and patient about the risks and benefits.

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