The impact of sex on the outcome of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has been suggested, but little is known about its impact on elderly patients with ACS.
This study analyzed the impact of sex on in-hospital and 1-year outcomes of elderly (≥75 years of age) patients with ACS hospitalized in our department between January 2013 and December 2017.
A total of 711 patients were included: 273 (38.4%) women and 438 (61.6%) men. Their age ranged from 75 to 94 years, similar between women and men. Women had more comorbidities (hypertension (79.5% vs. 72.8%, =0.050), diabetes mellitus (35.2% vs. 26.5%, =0.014), and hyperuricemia (39.9% vs. 32.4%, =0.042)) and had a higher prevalence of non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS) (79.5% vs. 71.2%, =0.014) than men. The prevalence of current smoking (56.5% vs. 5.4%, < 0.001), creatinine levels (124.4 ± 98.6 vs. 89.9 ± 54.1, < 0.001), and revascularization rate (39.7% vs. 30.0%, =0.022) were higher, and troponin TnT and NT-proBNP tended to be higher in men than in women. The in-hospital mortality rate was similar (3.5% vs. 4.4%, =0.693), but the 1-year mortality rate was lower in women than in men (14.7% vs. 21.7%, =0.020). The multivariable analysis showed that female sex was a protective factor for 1-year mortality in all patients (OR = 0.565, 95% CI 0.351-0.908, =0.018) and in patients with STEMI (OR = 0.416, 95% CI 0.184-0.940, =0.035) after adjustment.
Among the elderly patients with ACS, the 1-year mortality rate was lower in women than in men, which could be associated with comorbidities and ACS type.

Copyright © 2020 Shi Tai et al.

References

PubMed