The following is the summary of “A Review of Adverse Reactions to Biologics Used in Allergy-Immunology Practice” published in the December 2022 issue of Allergy and Clinical Immunology by Chow, et al.


For the treatment of asthma, atopic dermatitis, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps, and other immunologic disorders, allergists and immunologists are increasingly turning to the use of biologic medications as a crucial component of the therapeutic arsenal at their disposal. As a direct result of the significant differences between these molecules and the sorts of pharmaceuticals previously mentioned, a wide variety of unexpected effects have been identified. 

Most of these effects are not generally associated with traditional small-molecule therapies. In addition to the traditional Gell-Coombs categorization scheme, a different method must be applied to classify these reactions because the Gell-Coombs method does not catch a significant percentage of the adverse events that can be caused by biologic therapy. This is necessary because the Gell-Coombs approach can lead to the occurrence of adverse events. 

This article examines each authorized agent that is routinely used in allergy and immunology practice, and it also discusses the literature that is currently available on proposed classification systems and diagnostic techniques for adverse events related with biologics. Additionally, this article examines each authorized agent that is routinely used in allergy and immunology practice. In addition, each authorized agent that is frequently utilized in the field of allergy and immunology is scrutinized throughout this text.

Source: sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2213219822009564