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Nasal Airflow Measured by Rhinomanometry Correlates with FeNO in Children with Asthma.

Nasal Airflow Measured by Rhinomanometry Correlates with FeNO in Children with Asthma.
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Chen IC, Lin YT, Hsu JH, Liu YC, Wu JR, Dai ZK,


Chen IC, Lin YT, Hsu JH, Liu YC, Wu JR, Dai ZK, (click to view)

Chen IC, Lin YT, Hsu JH, Liu YC, Wu JR, Dai ZK,

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PloS one 2016 Oct 2811(10) e0165440 doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0165440
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Rhinitis and asthma share similar immunopathological features. Rhinomanometry is an important test used to assess nasal function and spirometry is an important tool used in asthmatic children. The degree to which the readouts of these tests are correlated has yet to be established. We sought to clarify the relationship between rhinomanometry measurements, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), and spirometric measurements in asthmatic children.

METHODS
Patients’ inclusion criteria: age between 5 and 18 years, history of asthma with nasal symptoms, and no anatomical deformities. All participants underwent rhinomanometric evaluations and pulmonary function and FeNO tests.

RESULTS
Total 84 children were enrolled. By rhinomanometry, the degree of nasal obstruction was characterized as follows: (1) no obstruction in 33 children, (2) slight obstruction in 29 children, and (3) moderate obstruction in 22 children. FeNO was significantly lower in patients without obstruction than those with slight or moderate obstruction. Dividing patients according to ATS Clinical Practice Guidelines regarding FeNO, patients < 12 years with FeNO > 20 ppb had a lower total nasal airflow rate than those with FeNO < 20 ppb. Patients ≥ 12 years with FeNO > 25 ppb had a lower total nasal airflow rate than those with FeNO < 25 ppb. CONCLUSIONS
Higher FeNO was associated with a lower nasal airflow and higher nasal resistance. This supports a relationship between upper and lower airway inflammation, as assessed by rhinomanometry and FeNO. The results suggest that rhinomanometry may be integrated as part of the functional assessment of asthma.

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